Report of the 3rd Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol

Distr.

GENERAL

UNEP/OzL.Pro.3/11

21 June 1991

ORIGINAL: ENGLISH

THIRD MEETING OF THE PARTIES TO THE MONTREAL PROTOCOL ON SUBSTANCES THAT DEPLETE THE OZONE LAYER

Nairobi, 19 - 21 June 1991

REPORT OF THE THIRD MEETING OF THE PARTIES TO THE MONTREAL PROTOCOL ON SUBSTANCES THAT DEPLETE THE OZONE LAYER


Introduction - Annex I - Annex II

Annex III - Annex IV - Annex V

Annex VI - Annex VII - Annex VIII

Annex IX - Annex X - Annex XI - Annex XII


INTRODUCTION

  • 1. The Third Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer was held at the headquarters of the
    1. United Nations Environment Programme, in Nairobi, from 19 to 21 June 1991.
  • I. OPENING OF THE MEETING
  • A. Opening remarks by the outgoing President of the Meeting of
    1. the Parties to the Montreal Protocol on Substances

    that Deplete the Ozone Layer

  • 2. The outgoing President, Mr. David Trippier, welcomed the delegates to the Meeting, and said that it was a time of splendid achievement, marked by the advance from a 50 per cent cut in CFCs and a freeze on halons to the phasing out of both by the end of the Century, control of other substances, acknowledgement of the unique position of transitional substances, recognition of the real difficulties experienced by developing countries in complying with control measures and a greater emphasis on the importance of technology transfer in enabling developing countries to meet their obligations under the Protocol. Not only had control measures been made more effective, but
    1. 17 countries had acceded to the Protocol since June 1990. There were few examples in the history of diplomacy where so many nations had agreed solidly to address a common concern.
  • 3. The London agreement had represented a great advance on Montreal and Helsinki, including in particular the very problematical development of a new funding mechanism. Mr. Trippier said that great credit was due to the untiring efforts of the Executive Committee and its Chairman and ViceChairman, Ambassadors Ristimaki and Mateos for making the Interim Multilateral Fund a reality. There was however still a long way to go. Above all, he said, was the need to develop country studies as the bedrock for robust and implementable action on a country by country basis.
  • 4. Mr. Trippier observed that, at its Fourth Meeting this week, the Executive Committee had worked out framework agreements with the three Implementing Agencies UNEP, UNDP and the World Bank and agreed work programmes enabling those Agencies to carry out co-ordinated and wideranging operations for the rest of present year. Now the Committee would need to look forward beyond 1992 into the future.
    1. Na.91-6017 /...
  • 5. It was important right from the start to be clear about the difference between "hard technology", such as equipment and sophisticated operations and processes, and "soft technology", including publications, personnel exchanges, education and training. He was happy that the United Kingdom was playing an important role in the Technical and Economics Assessment Panel. The strengthening of UNEP's Industry and Environment Office was another very welcome development. Although there were many sources of funding for technology transfer, particular emphasis had to be placed on the most costeffective and efficient measures available, appropriate to the particular country's agreed phaseout programme.
  • 6. Mr. Trippier emphasized the importance of Parties ratifying the London Amendment, so that it could enter into force as planned on 1 January 1992. The next step was to make clear to the world the determination of the Parties to make noncompliance work and provide for an efficient implementation procedure.
  • 7. Further amendment of the Protocol was another very important issue, since new findings, for example satellite data, were becoming available all the time and it now appeared that ozone depletion over the globe as a whole was running at twice the anticipated level. The European Community had already agreed to phase out CFCs by 1997 and hoped that other countries would do the same. The Protocol should be amended to reflect that situation. But that was not enough. The Technology and Economics Assessment Panel should be asked to assess the implications of phasing out halons, carbon tetrachloride and methyl chloroform also by 1997.
  • 8. It would again be necessary to look more closely at transitional substances and confirm that the guidelines set in 1990 were in fact adequate, since mistakes could delay the planned phaseout of CFCs. The strategy of limiting the overall supply of ozone depleting substances had been successful beyond expectations and had encouraged industry to find different ways of cleaning, of blowing foam and of preserving food. The same sort of mechanism should be applied to the transitional substances, since the markets and industrial structure were much the same and the environmental problem similar. Since any phaseout date set in 1992 would be highly provisional and kept under constant review, it would be necessary to keep quantities down to acceptable levels right from the start.
  • 9. What had impressed him above all in his office as President had been the strength of the Montreal Protocol as a dynamic, ever changing instrument.
  • B. Election of the President, three VicePresidents
    1. and the Rapporteur
  • 10. In accordance with Rule 21, paragraph 1 of the Rules of Procedure, the President, three VicePresidents and the Rapporteur were elected unanimously, on the basis of regional groups, as specified in the resolution 2997 of the United Nations General Assembly at its 2112th meeting on 15 December 1972:
  • President: Mr. Ojwang K'Ombudo (Kenya)

    VicePresidents: Mr. Peter Chin Fah Kui (Malaysia)

    Mr. Ryszard Purski (Poland)

    Mr. Eduardo Lopez (Venezuela)

    Rapporteur: Mr. John A. Whitelaw (Australia)

  • C. Statement by the President
  • 11. The President welcomed all the participants to Kenya and expressed his gratitude for the honour bestowed upon him by his election. The work of the bodies created to implement the Montreal Protocol had lived up to expectations. He also paid tribute to the work of the Executive Director of UNEP, the Secretariat for the Vienna Convention and its Montreal Protocol and the outgoing President, Mr. David Trippier, Minister of the Environment of the United Kingdom. He hoped that the spirit of cooperation shown so far would continue to prevail as the work of the Parties was now at a crucial stage. The world community was eager for action on protection of the ozone layer, and he was sure that the Parties would not be found wanting in that respect.
  • D. Statement by the Executive Director of UNEP
  • 12. In his statement, the Executive Director paid tribute to the effort of the outgoing President, his predecessor and the Bureau, which had left a lasting mark on international relations, and wished the new President and Bureau every success in their tasks ahead. The countries that had joined the Protocol since the London Meeting, including 13 developing countries, took the total of Contracting Parties to 71. The Interim Multilateral Fund had been established and had become operational on 1 January 1991 as decided by the Parties. The Chief Officer of the Fund had assumed his function in February and the Executive Committee had already worked hard to build a solid foundation for an unprecedented financial mechanism. The implementing agencies (UNDP, the World Bank and UNEP) had agreed co-ordinated programmes which had been examined by the Executive Committee over the past few days. He introduced the new Co-ordinator of the Secretariat for the Vienna Convention and its Montreal Protocol, Mr. Sarma. He paid tribute to the outstanding work done by Dr. Rummel-Bulska, Chief of the Environmental Law and Institutions Unit on making the Montreal Protocol a reality.
  • 13. The Executive Director stressed that statesmanship of a high order would be needed in the future, as recent research by NASA and the WMO Global Ozone Observing System has established that depletion of the ozone layer was accelerating at a higher level than predicted and was spreading to non-polar regions. Even with an immediate phase-out of all CFCs and related components, ozone destruction would increase well into the next century.
  • 14. Therefore the Executive Director stressed the importance of the London Amendment, which had been ratified so far by two Parties only. He urged Governments to speed up the process of ratification to ensure entry into force of the Amendment by 1 January 1992, noting that the USSR had signalled its ratification and that Sweden had agreed on 4 June 1991 to ratify. Several other Governments were in the process of ratification and China had acceded to the Protocol as amended in London. Ratification by China would mean that the level of the Multilateral Fund would need adjusting to US$200 million for the years 1991-1993, a matter the Parties should decide on at this meeting. China would need technical and financial support to move to implementation of the Protocol.
  • 15. The Executive Director also addressed the difficulties encountered by the Fund because of delayed contributions; US$12.7 million had been received so far. He reminded the Parties that even if financial resources were available to developing countries, there was still the question of availability of technologies. Industry should be encouraged to make still further and faster progress in developing replacement chemicals and technologies so that all countries could be assisted to find solutions to their problems and those that
    1. had not yet done so could become Parties to the Montreal Protocol. One of the success stories in the struggle to protect the ozone layer concerned Mexico, which was phasing out CFCs aerosols faster than some developed nations. There was a need to replicate such successes.
  • 16. Another pressing need addressed by the Executive Director was the monitoring of non-compliance and the reaction of the Parties to delayed reporting of data. Guidance from the meeting would be helpful for the finalizing of the study of non-compliance procedures. Other matters for the meeting to consider included the responsibilities of countries operating on the basis of Article 5 which exceeded a consumption level of 0.3 kg per capita per annum; the application by one country from the Western European and other group to be considered as a developing country for the purpose of the protocol; and a number of trade issues.
  • 17. Extraordinary progress had been made under the Montreal Protocol thanks to public opinion, a real spirit of partnership established between the Parties, and the work of the Assessment Panels. The second report from the Assessment Panels, to be completed before the end of 1991, together with other issues, might signal the need for the further amendment of the Protocol.
  • 18. Finally, the Executive Director recommended that the next Meeting be held in September 1992, to allow the Open-Ended Working Group of the Parties to consider any adjustments and amendments necessitated by the report of the second assessment. He expressed his conviction that although there were still many difficulties to be overcome, the spirit of co-operation and the progress achieved so far were such that the damage done to the planet could be corrected.
  • II. ORGANIZATIONAL MATTERS
  • A. Attendance
  • 19. The following 46 Parties to the Montreal Protocol were represented:
    1. Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Byelorussian SSR, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, Denmark, Egypt, Finland, France, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mexico, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Poland, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Tunisia, Uganda, Ukrainian SSR, United Kingdom, USA, USSR, Venezuela, Yugoslavia, Zambia and EEC.

    The following 23 States not party to the Protocol were also represented:

    Algeria, Angola, Bhutan, Burundi, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Equatorial Guinea, Guinea, India, Indonesia, Republic of Korea, Morocco, Niger, Philippines, Peru, Sao Tome & Principe, Sudan, United Republic of Tanzania, Turkey, Yemen and Zimbabwe.

    Observers from the following United Nations bodies and specialized agencies were also present:

    GATT Secretariat, I.C.A.O., IMO, UNCED, UNCHS (Habitat), UNDP, WMO, World Bank.

    The following other organizations were represented:

    Alliance for Responsible CFC Policy, ARI (Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute), CEFIC, Friends of the Earth, Greenpeace International, Halogenated Solvents Industry Association (HSIA), Harvard Global Environmental Policy Project, ICC, Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI), International Council on Environmental Law, Japan Industrial Conference for Ozone Protection (JICOP), Kenya Consumers Organization (KCO), Pharmaceutical Aerosol CFC Coalition (PACC), Pro Scientia, Ulsan Chemical Company Ltd.

  • B. Adoption of the agenda
  • 20. The following agenda, as contained in document UNEP/OzL.Pro.3/1/Rev.1, was adopted:
  • 1. Opening of the Meeting:
  • (a) Opening remarks by the outgoing President;
  • (b) Election of the President, VicePresidents and the Rapporteur;
  • (c) Statement by the President;
  • (d) Statement by the Executive Director of UNEP.
  • 2. Organizational matters:
  • (a) Adoption of the agenda;
  • (b) Organization of work.
  • 3. Credentials of the representatives.
  • 4. Proposed amendments to the Rules of Procedure.
  • 5. Consideration of the report of the Executive Director of UNEP to the Third Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol:
  • (a) Implementation of the decisions of the Second Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol (London,
  • 2729 June 1990):

  • (b) Status of the Interim Multilateral Fund.
  • 6. Consideration of the report of the Executive Committee on the progress made with regard to the establishment and operation of the Interim Multilateral Fund:
  • (a) Revised 1991 budget for the Fund Secretariat;
  • (b) The threeyear programme budget for the Fund;
  • (c) Criteria for project eligibility and guidelines for the implementation of activities supported by the Fund;
  • (d) Criteria for considering bilateral and, in particular cases, regional cooperation as a contribution to the Fund;
  • (e) Operational policies, guidelines and administrative arrangements;
  • (f) Rules of procedure for the Executive Committee;
  • (g) Tripartite agreement among the World Bank, UNDP and UNEP;
  • (h) Specific agreements between the Executive Committee and the implementing agencies.
  • 7. Proposed annex to the Montreal Protocol: List of products containing the controlled substances.
  • 8. Information reported by the Parties in accordance with Articles 7 and 9 of the Montreal Protocol: Secretariat's reports pursuant to Article 12 ©.
  • 9. Revised budget for the Trust Fund for the Montreal Protocol for 1991 and the proposed budget for the biennium 19921993, including the cost of the participation of developing countries.
  • 10. Accession by Turkey to the Montreal Protocol.
  • 11. Date and venue for the Fourth Meeting of the Parties.
  • 12. Other matters.
  • 13. Adoption of the report.
  • 14. Closure of the Meeting.
  • C. Organization of work
  • 21. The Meeting took up the agenda item by item.
  • III. CREDENTIALS
  • 22. In accordance with rule 19 of the Rules of Procedure, the officers of the Meeting examined the credentials of representatives and, having found them to be in good and due form, so reported to the Meeting.
  • IV. SUBSTANTIVE MATTERS
  • 23. The Preparatory Meeting had proposed that Rules 23 and 24 of the Rules of Procedure of the Meetings of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol be amended to read as follows:
  • Rule 23

    If the President is temporarily absent from a session or any part thereof, he shall designate a VicePresident to act as President. Rule 24

    If an officer resigns or is otherwise unable to complete his term of office or to perform his functions, a representative of the same Party shall be named by the Party concerned to replace him for the remainder of his mandate.

    The proposed amendments were adopted without objection.

  • 24. The delegate of China said that the gradual reduction in the volume of ozone depleting substances was a vital element in the protection of the environment. Only combined efforts of Contracting Parties and developing countries at the Second Meeting of the Parties, in which China had played an active part, had enabled the Amendment to the Protocol to be adopted, thus tightening up control measures and providing financial support for activities of developing countries in the cause of environmental protection. Against that background the delegation had expressed at the Second Meeting the clear intention of his country to accede to the Amended Protocol. In the meantime the necessary technical structures had been set up and the legal formalities for accession completed. The Instrument of Accession had been deposited with the United Nations as Depositary on 14 June 1991. A year ago, with the help of an Expert Working Group from UNDP, China had completed a study on the phaseout of controlled substances and formulated a threeyear plan for the first phase of implementation of the phaseout.
  • 25. Many delegations welcomed the statement and congratulated China on its accession to the Montreal Protocol and recalled China's valuable input into discussion of the proposed financial measures of the Second Meeting. Several also observed that early discussion of a country programme with China would be necessary and the total sum of the Multilateral Fund increased accordingly. One Delegation announced an immediate increase in its contribution to the Multilateral Fund to US $2m and looked forward to the time when it would be possible to tear up those parts of the Protocol which dealt with nonParties. Many delegations expressed wishes to expand co-operation with China and referred in this connection to their on-going and planned activities. There was general agreement that China's accession to the Montreal Protocol was an essential step in the process of implementing the Montreal Protocol.
  • 26. The delegation of the Republic of Korea said that its Government, concerned by the level of environmental contamination, had already imposed strict measures to protect the ozone layer by legislative measures and institutional restructuring, but felt bound to draw attention to the very adverse effects which such measures were likely to have on young industrial countries. In view of the extent of investment in CFC manufacture, any drastic reduction in output could result in serious unemployment and social unrest. Nevertheless legislation had been passed and would be implemented. It was hoped that this cooperative attitude would be met by a voluntary transfer of technology and appropriate financial resources. Success would only be possible if developing and developed countries worked together.
  • 27. The delegate of Malaysia said that, when his country became Party to the Protocol in November 1989, parallel action had been taken to introduce Customs Control regulations to monitor CFC and halon imports, but unfortunately that had given rise to technical difficulties and countries with developing economies required time to adjust to the provisions of the protocol. It was during the interim period that noncompliance tended to occur. Malaysia, as a country operating under Article 5, paragraph 1, had already initiated processes for the elimination of CFCs and halons from the aerosol, solvent, cleaning, refrigeration, air conditioning, fire protection, foam manufacturing and other sectors. The Implementation Committee was a very important organ. Malaysia further suggested that its efficiency could be greatly improved by an equitable distribution of the membership between developed and developing countries. The delegate of Malaysia said that the establishment of the Multilateral Fund as a new and additional financial resource was precedent-setting and it could well be a future model. Malaysia, as a member of the Executive Committee of the Multilateral Fund, had made a positive and constructive contribution to the work of the Committee and faithfully represented the views of other developing countries in the Asian region.
  • 28. One delegation pointed out that the Amendment to the Protocol, made at the time of the Second Meeting, was an important contribution to environmental protection, but had been overtaken by some recent scientific findings, which necessitated more stringent regulations. Phaseout could of course only be achieved by a transfer of technology to the developing countries. This delegation among others was sponsoring a draft resolution, stressing the urgency of the situation, and hoped that other delegations would rally to its support. The country's national plan provided for phaseout of all currently controlled substances to be complete well before 1997. Another most important issue was the need to provide Assessment Panels with their terms of reference well in advance, to enable them to organize their work.
  • 29. A nongovernmental organization reported on the establishment and implementation of control measures in one area of a country in accordance with Article 2 of the Protocol, which had been revised and updated after the Second Meeting of the Parties. This had resulted in a 30 per cent reduction in total consumption of controlled substances in 1990 in the area, corresponding to
    1. 70 per cent of the 1986 level. The organization stated that this represented a major effort in the spirit of the Montreal Protocol and wished to contribute both technically and financially to the global efforts to protect the ozone layer.
  • 30. The Chairman of the Scientific Assessment Panel, Dr. R.T. Watson, said that assessments of scientific and environmental impacts and a technology/economic assessment had been initiated that would provide the scientific and technical information required as a basis for possible amendments to the amended Montreal Protocol to be considered by the Parties at their Fourth Meeting in 1992. The scientific assessment would include a discussion of: trends in ozone and other chemical constituents both globally and regionally; comparison of observed and calculated ozone trends; prediction of atmospheric chlorine loading, ozone depletion and the contribution to global warming for a number of scenarios concerning CFCs, HCFCs, HFCs and the space shuttle, and a revised table of ozone depleting and global warming potentials. The environmental impacts assessed would cover human health (skin cancer, eye cataracts and suppression of the immune system), terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, material damage and tropospheric oxidants. The technology/economic assessment would review the technical and economic aspects of substitution of CFCs for refrigerants, foam blowing agents, solvents and aerosol propellants, and halons. The synthesis document would be completed, translated in all languages and sent to the printers by
    1. 1 December 1991. The latest satellite and groundbased ozone data demonstrated that the rate of ozone depletion at mid and high latitudes in both hemispheres was greater than previously measured. In addition, current gasphase photochemical models underestimated by factors of 25 the observed ozone loss. While the cause of the observed ozone depletion had not been unequivocally identified, the ozone changes coupled with other atmospheric data were strongly suggestive of a chlorineinduced effect. The new scientific data, coupled with simple model calculations of atmospheric chlorine loading, suggested that the following measures would be required in order to minimize the projected peak chlorine loading, ozone depletion, elimination of the Antarctic Ozone hole and the observed midlatitude ozone loss: a reduction in the emissions of longlived CFCs, CCL4, CH3CCL3 and halons, as soon as possible, with global compliance; transitional substitution for longlived CFCs with HCFCs having the shortest possible lifetimes, hence low ODP values; the recycling of HCFCs to the maximum extent possible, the notinkind substitution of CFCs wherever practical; phaseout of HCFCs sometime during the next century (phaseout date should depend upon the atmospheric lifetime of the substitute); and possible emission rate limitations. Parties should recognize that HCFCs were not all equal; those with short lifetimes, i.e., 15 years, posed a significantly lower threat to the ozone layer and global warming than those with moderate lifetimes, i.e., greater than 15 years.
  • 31. Since one delegation objected to the inclusion of parts of above paragraph 30, it was agreed that the text should be referred to the Chairman of the Scientific Assessment Panel for review and any necessary revision.
  • 32. The Chairman of the Implementation Committee, Ms. Bjorklund, recalled that the Committee had been established to respond quickly to early indications of noncompliance, with the aim of resolving problems amicably and obviating the need for recourse to formal arbitration or the International Court of Justice. This was a new way of solving such conflicts and, if successful, would set a precedent in the environmental field. However, as the Brundtland Commission had stressed, all aspects relating to agreements and mechanisms for dealing with noncompliance needed to be precisely defined. At its meeting in December 1990 and April 1991, the Implementation Committee had studied the draft noncompliance procedures developed by the Ad Hoc Working Group of Legal Experts and had called for central clarifications and for consideration of new elements for inclusion as outlined in the Committee reports (documents UNEP/OzL.Pro/Imp.Com.1/2 and 2/3). A number of these issues were reflected in draft Decision III/2 to be considered by the Parties, but further guidance from the Parties would be useful. The Implementation Committee had also examined the data reported in accordance with Article 7 of the Montreal Protocol and concluded that reporting was not satisfactory: of 71 Parties, only 31 had reported complete data for 1986. Of the remainder,
    1. 19 had reported incomplete data, 6 had reported no data available and/or requested assistance, 2 had reported that their data were included in those of another Party and 13 had not reported data. Of 48 Parties required to report data for 1989, only 23 had complied by May 1991, and only 20 of these had submitted complete data. Some developing countries were experiencing serious reporting problems owing to lack of technical and economic resources. She noted that the Ad Hoc Working Group of Legal Experts had suggested several ways of solving these problems, including the establishment of import control by customs regulations based on a harmonized commodity system. The Implementation Committee had stressed the need for technical and financial support to countries to enable them to comply with the provisions of the Montreal Protocol with regard to data reporting and felt that the Multilateral Fund was of assistance in this regard. Establishing noncompliance when the only resource was the lack of such support would only hurt the developing countries.
  • 33. Discussing the draft decisions recommended for adoption by the Preparatory Meeting, draft Decision III/2 (Noncompliance procedure), as amended, was adopted.
  • 34. In regard to draft Decision III/3 (Implementation Committee), two delegations felt that it was important to clarify that the noncompliance procedure should be without prejudice to the operation of the settlement of disputes procedure laid down in Article 11 of the Vienna Convention. Draft Decision III/3, as amended, was adopted.
  • 35. It was suggested that the Montreal Protocol Handbook (draft
    1. Decision III/4) might with advantage be made available for sale, and also that it could be issued in a computerreadable version. The draft decision was adopted.
  • 36. Draft Decision III/8 (Trade names for Controlled Substances) was adopted with the amendments recommended by the Bureau. It was recommended that when the list of trade names had been finalized, it should be annexed, for reference, to the instruction sheet for the formats for reporting of data.
  • 37. Draft Decision III/10 (Destruction Technologies) was adopted with the amendments proposed by the Bureau. One delegation drew attention to the large body of expertise available and recommended the participation of other experts, perhaps in the capacity of observers.
  • 38. During discussion of draft Decision III/13 (further adjustments to and amendments of the Protocol) it was agreed that the OpenEnded Working Group should be requested to submit a report on the proposals to the Fourth Meeting of the Parties. Some delegates requested clarification in regard to the position of a country operating under Article 5, paragraph 1 which exceeded the 0.3 kg ceiling for controlled substances, in particular whether that would lead to its disqualification. Many delegations believed that the Protocol was clear on that point. In view of the serious consequences to the Party concerned, the matter was referred to the OpenEnded Working Group of the Parties for examination and any recommendations that might be necessary. Draft Decision III/13, as amended was adopted.
  • 39. The Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Interim Multilateral Ozone Fund of the Montreal Protocol, Mr. Ilkka Ristimaki, introduced the draft report of the Fourth Meeting of the Executive Committee (UNEP/OzL.Pro./ExCom/4/12) and informed the meeting of a number of amendments that should be reflected in the report.
  • 40. The Chairman summarized the actions and decisions taken by the Executive Committee with regard to the operation of the Interim Multilateral Ozone Fund during the first year. The legal basis and the financial regulations were drawn up in good time to enable the Fund to become effective from
    1. 1 January 1991, with Montreal as the venue of its Secretariat. Mr. Omar ElArini, appointed as Chief Officer, assumed his functions in February 1991 and all staff would have been recruited by the end of 1991. The Executive Committee had held four meetings, the first in September 1990. He expressed the Committee's gratitude to UNEP and the Canadian authorities for interim Secretariat services.
  • 41. The Executive Committee had adopted provisional rules of procedure for its meetings which were submitted to the meeting of the Parties for endorsement (document UNEP/OzL.Pro./ExCom/3/18, Annex II). Further, a revised 1991 budget was presented for the adoption of the Parties in the same report (document UNEP/OzL.Pro./ExCom/3/18, Annex I). The threeyear budget for 19911993 was presented for adoption in two separate documents, the administrative budget for the Fund Secretariat in document UNEP/OzL.Pro./ExCom/3/18, Annex IV and the operational budget in document
    1. UNEP/OzL.Pro./ExCom/4/11/Rev.1. A revised version of the threeyear budget would need to be prepared and presented to the Parties in the light of the decision of China to accede to the Protocol. The scale of contributions by Parties to the Fund required updating to take account of new states not operating under Article 5, paragraph 1 which had become Parties, the unification of Germany and the accession by China to the Protocol.
  • 42. The Committee had developed and adopted "Implementation Guidelines and Criteria for Project Selection" (document UNEP/OzL.Pro./ExCom/3/18,
    1. Annex III). Each Party was invited to draw up a country programme to serve as a basis for project operation and financing from the Fund.
  • 43. Tripartite interagency agreements had been signed between UNEP, UNDP and the World Bank and individual agreements between these agencies and the Executive Committee were ready for signing. At its fourth meeting the Executive Committee approved work programmes by the three agencies for 1991.
    1. The total amounts approved to the agencies as of 18 June 1991: UNEP US$1,676,920; UNDP US$1,261,800; World Bank US$5,000,000, yielding a total of US$7,938,720.
  • 44. At its next meeting the Executive Committee would consider country programmes, separate projects submitted by Parties, possible additional proposals by the implementing agencies for the 1991 work programmes, and proposals for the agencies work programmes for 1992 and 1993.
  • 45. The Chairman referred to the terms of reference of the Executive Committee which stated that the office of chairman was to rotate on an annual basis between the Parties operating under paragraph 1 of Article 5 and the Parties not so operating. For the annual rotation to take place the two groups of countries should be invited to select the Chairman and the ViceChairman accordingly and present their selection to the Parties for endorsement.
  • 46. Referring to the need to revise the scale of contributions, the Assistant Executive Director proposed that the total amount of contributions for 1991 agreed by the Second Meeting of the Parties should remain unchanged but that the total amount of contributions in 1992 and 1993 be increased by
    1. US$20 million each year, raising the threeyear total from US$160 million to US$200 million. In accordance with the United Nations regular budget scale of
    2. assessment, the percentage contributions of new states will be: Bulgaria 0.15, Czechoslovakia 0.66 and Poland 0.56. The revised percentage contribution for unified Germany would be 9.36. The contributions for 1992 and 1993 would be recalculated accordingly. One delegation emphasized the need to take into consideration the difficulties being experienced by countries undergoing economic transition, particularly in Eastern and Central Europe.
  • 47. A number of delegations paid tribute to the work of the Executive Committee and of its Chairman and Vice-Chairman and welcomed the progress made. One delegation noted the need to develop quickly strategies for funding country programmes which would maximize available resources. One delegation clarified that its inkind contributions to the Multilateral Fund would include transfer of technology, provision of expertise and training. Another delegation expressed the hope that strategies could be developed and put into effect quickly so that money earmarked for bilateral and regional projects could be utilized.
  • 48. The representative of the World Bank welcomed the progress made by the Executive Committee. Preparatory work in countries not party to the Protocol had placed the World Bank in a position to respond quickly when those countries joined, as was the case with China. A number of studies had identified suitable investment programmes but commitments could not be made unless funds were available. He therefore emphasized the need for timely contributions. He drew attention to the possibility of assisting countries not covered by the Multilateral Fund through the Global Environment Facility.
  • 49. After some discussion, including the approval of certain amendments to the Rules of Procedure for meetings of the Executive Committee, the Meeting endorsed the Rules of Procedure as contained in Annex VI of this report, and adopted decisions concerning the Interim Multilateral Ozone Fund
    1. (Decision III/22). The revised 1991 budget for the Fund Secretariat was adopted as contained in Annex VII to this report. The three-year plan and budget for the Fund Secretariat and the three-year budget for Fund Operations are contained in Annexes VIII and IX, respectively. The revised scale of contributions was adopted as contained in Annex X.
  • 50. The Assistant Executive Director introduced the revised budgets for 1991, and proposed budgets for 1992 and 1993 for the Trust Fund for the Montreal Protocol prepared after consultation with the subgroup set up by the Preparatory Meeting to consider the matter in detail. Although a number of changes had been made in individual budget lines, the overall total of the 1991 budget showed no change from that adopted by the Second Meeting of the Parties and no additional contributions from Parties would be necessary. He emphasized that the proposed budgets would only be viable if all Parties paid their contributions as far as possible early in the year. The Parties noted the status of contributions in 1990 and 1991 as contained in Annex III and the 1990 expenditures as contained in Annex IV to this report. The Parties adopted a decision on budgets and financial matters (Decision III/21). The revised 1991 budget and the 1992 and 1993 budgets adopted by the Parties are contained in Annex I to this report and theadopted list of contributions to be made by the Parties is contained in Annex II of this report.
  • 51. During discussion on the proposed annex to the Montreal Protocol containing a list of products containing controlled substances, one delegation expressed doubt regarding the desirability of including portable fire extinguishers. Another delegation said that their inclusion was necessary in terms of Article 4, paragraph 3. One delegation raised the possibility of including transportation refrigeration units. It was pointed out that the subgroup set up by the Preparatory Meeting had considered that issue but had recommended that they should not be included in view of the implications for trade in refrigerated goods, especially foodstuffs. Two delegations felt that to do so would impinge on sensitive areas covered by GATT. One delegation requested that the legal position with regard to GATT be clarified. One delegation stated its understanding from Article 4, paragraphs 3 and 3 bis, that nonParties had the right, at the time of joining, to object to the annex. The list was adopted, with the title amended to ensure that it was unambiguous (Decision III/15). The Parties adopted the list as contained in Annex V of this report. The Secretariat agreed to identify the relevant Brussels nomenclature numbers as well as those of the Harmonized Commodity Systems. It was pointed out that the products listed in Annex D could also be manufactured without containing controlled substances. The Parties emphasized that the products listed in Annex D are only those that contain controlled substances.
  • 52. During the discussion on agenda item 8, one delegation stated that the data reported for his country in accordance with Article 7 had not been authorized by the Government but had been provided on an unauthorized basis. Now that the country was a Party to the Montreal Protocol, it would be in a better position to collect official data. In discussions regarding its country programme, it had been agreed with the World Bank that clarification of the data would be sought during implementation of the programme, due to start in September 1991. He hoped that the matter could be clarified prior to the Fourth Meeting of the Parties. The Meeting was informed that the Secretariat would obtain further information from this country.
  • 53. After discussion of a draft decision on assessment panels, an amended text was adopted (Decision III/12). Some delegations stated that their countries, in view of their current economic and financial situation, would be unable to adapt to a more stringent timetable for ozone depleting substances control than that set out by the Second Meeting of the Parties or to comply with the obligation to include various transitional substances in the list of controlled substances.
  • 54. After considering draft Decision III/20 (Composition of the Implementation Committee), it was decided to retain the present geographical distribution of members of the Implementation Committee, but to increase the number to ten. It was also decided to delete the last sentence of paragraph 3 of Annex III (Noncompliance procedure) contained in document UNEP/OzL.Pro.2/3 (Report of the Second Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol) and to amend the word five to ten in line 2 of the paragraph. One delegation proposed a consequent amendment to subparagraph (e) of Decision III/3 (Implementation Committee), confirming the present five members of the Implementation Committee in office for a further year and calling on the geographical groups to nominate five further members for election to the Committee for a period of 2 years. Decision III/3 (e) was adopted after the election of the five further members. Parties should take account of legal and technical expertise when nominating members. The amendment to Annex III of document UNEP/OzL.Pro.2/3 was adopted.
  • 55. During consideration of the accession of Turkey to the Montreal Protocol, the Secretariat introduced the Executive Director's explanatory note on the list of developing countries. On a point of order, one delegation objected to consideration of the issue, since the Secretariat had not reported on the administrative and financial implications in accordance with Rule 14 of the Rules of Procedure. The same delegation mentioned that the note in question was no more than background information addressed to the Bureau of the Second Meeting of the Parties and in no way complied with provisions of Rule 14. The delegation proposed that, as there were serious implications, consideration be deferred until the Fourth Meeting of the Parties. The Secretariat explained that the actual implications had been pointed out in the note and that it had complied with Rule 14. Some delegations commented that the item had been included in the agenda circulated well before the Meeting and adopted by the Parties. After some discussion, the Parties agreed to consider the subject at the Meeting.
  • 56. The delegation of Turkey said that its Government wished to apply for developing country status on the grounds that it was considered as a developing country by a number of international organizations, its per capita GNP was US$1,300 per annum, and its consumption of controlled substances was only 0.07 kg per capita. A member of the Bureau of the Second Meeting of the Parties introduced a draft decision recommended by the Bureau for consideration by the Parties. Many delegations expressed support for the inclusion of Turkey on the list of developing countries. However, some concern was expressed in connection with Turkey's application for membership of the EEC and about reopening the list of developing countries in general. It was pointed out that countries not eligible for support from the Multilateral Fund could apply for assistance through the Global Environment Facility. There was a consensus that the OpenEnded Working Group of the Parties should be requested to study and further define the criteria to be applied to any new Party seeking classification as a developing country. One delegation proposed that consideration be given to a new category to include countries which neither contributed to nor received support from the Multilateral Fund. The Meeting adopted Decision III/5.
  • 57. The Rapporteur announced that the Parties operating under Article 5, paragraph 1, had agreed that the composition of the group of Parties so operating would be as follows for the second year of the operation of the Executive Committee: two seats for Latin America and Caribbean, two seats for Africa and three seats for Asia. The Asian group had selected Sri Lanka as its third member country in the Committee. Sri Lanka would occupy that seat for one year after which it would rotate to Africa. In the third year, the position of the ViceChairman would rotate to the group of Parties operating under Article 5, paragraph 1 and that group had earmarked Asia for that position. In the same year Brazil would occupy the seat vacated by Mexico, which would resign from the Committee after completion of its second year. The membership from the group of Parties operating under Article 5, paragraph 1, for the second year would be as follows: Egypt, Ghana, Jordan, Malaysia, Mexico, Sri Lanka and Venezuela. The membership from that group in the third year will be as follows: Brazil, Egypt, Ghana, Jordan, Malaysia, Venezuela and a member to be nominated by the African Group. The Rapporteur further reported that, as required by the terms of reference for the Executive Committee, the Group of Parties operating under Article 5, paragraph 1, had selected Mexico for the post of Chairman of the Executive Committee. A representative of the Parties not operating under Article 5, Paragraph 1 stated that the members representing this group of Parties in the Executive Committee would continue for the second year and that USA has been selected by this group as the Vice-Chairman of the Executive Committee. The Parties noted the decisions of the two groups of Parties regarding the composition of the Executive Committee.
  • 58. During discussion of the date and venue for the Fourth Meeting of the Parties, the Parties welcomed the announcement by the delegation of Denmark that its Government wished to host the Meeting. It was agreed that the Fourth Meeting of the Parties should be convened in September or October 1992 (Decision III/18). The dates would be finalized in cooperation with the Secretariat and circulated as soon as possible.
  • V. DECISIONS
  • 59. The Third Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer decided:
  • Decision III/1. Adjustments and amendment
  • (a) To bring to the attention of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol the fact that the Adjustments to the Protocol adopted at the Second Meeting of the Parties came into effect on 7 March 1991 and to urge them to adopt the necessary measures to comply with the adjusted control measures; and
  • (b) To note that only two States have so far ratified the Amendment, adopted at the Second Meeting of the Parties to the Protocol and to urge all States to ratify that Amendment in view of the fact that twenty instruments of ratification, approval or acceptance are required for it to come into force on 1 January 1992;
  • Decision III/2. Noncompliance Procedure
  • (a) To request the Ad Hoc Working Group of Legal Experts on the Noncompliance Procedure with the Montreal Protocol, when elaborating further the procedures on noncompliance, to:
  • (i) Identify possible situations of noncompliance with the Protocol;
  • (ii) Develop an indicative list of advisory and conciliatory measures to encourage full compliance;
  • (iii) Reflect the role of the Implementation Committee as an advisory and conciliatory body bearing in mind that the recommendation of the Implementation Committee on Non-compliance Procedure must always be referred to the meeting of the Parties for final decision;
  • (iv) Reflect the possible need for legal interpretation of the provisions of the Protocol;
  • (v) Draw up an indicative list of measures that might be taken by a meeting of the Parties in respect of Parties that are not in compliance with the Protocol, bearing in mind the need to provide all assistance possible to countries, particularly developing countries, to enable them to comply with the Protocol;
  • (vi) Endorse the conclusion of the Ad Hoc Working Group of Legal Experts that the judicial and arbitral settlement of disputes provided for in Article 11 of the Vienna Convention and the Non-compliance Procedure pursuant to Article 8 of the Montreal Protocol were two distinct and separate procedures (UNEP/OzL.Pro/WG.3/2/3);
  • (b) To adopt the following timetable for finalization of the draft noncompliance procedures for consideration by the Fourth Meeting of the Parties to the Protocol:
  • October 1991: Meeting of the Ad Hoc Working Group of Legal Experts to complete the draft procedures for endorsement by the Parties;

    November 1991: Submission of draft noncompliance procedures to the Ozone Secretariat;

    December 1991: Circulation of draft noncompliance procedures to the Parties;

    Decision III/3. Implementation Committee

  • (a) To note the progress made by the Implementation Committee and to urge strongly that the Parties that have not yet done so should submit without delay the data required by the Montreal Protocol;
  • (b) That those States, not forming part of a regional economic integration organization, which had reported data jointly in the past should submit separate data in the future, and do so, if appropriate, in the context of Decision III/7 (a);
  • (c) To note that the period for data reporting is 1 January to
  • 31 December (Article 7, paragraph 2) and that the control period is 1 July to

    30 June (Article 2, paragraph 1) and to request the Parties to report the data for both periods;

  • (d) To endorse the recommendation on the categorization of the developing countries under paragraph 1 of Article 5:
    1. "In the light of the figures contained in the report on data (UNEP/OzL.Pro/WG.2/1/3 and Add.1), the recommendation contained in paragraph 14 (e) of the report of the Ad hocGroup of Experts on the Reporting of Data (UNEP/OzL.Pro/WG.2/1/4), the Committee determined that the following developing countries should be temporarily categorized as not operating under Article 5, paragraph 1: Bahrain, Malta, Singapore and United Arab Emirates. All other developing countries were considered to be operating under Article 5,
    2. paragraph 1.";
  • (e) To confirm the positions of Hungary, Japan, Norway, Trinidad and Tobago, and Uganda as members of the Implementation Committee for one further year, and to select Cameroon, Chile, Thailand, USA and USSR for a two year period;
  • Decision III/4. Montreal Protocol Handbook

    To welcome the efforts of the Secretariat in completing the Montreal Protocol Handbook, which was prepared by the Secretariat in accordance with Decision II/7 of the Second Meeting of the Parties, and to request the Secretariat after further editing, taking into account the comments made in paragraph 18 of the Report of the Preparatory Meeting for the Third Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol (UNEP/OzL.Pro.3/Prep/2), to distribute the Handbookto all the Parties to the Protocol and the Convention in the official languages of the United Nations as soon as possible; Decision III/5. Definition of developing countries

  • (a) To consider the requests by States for classification as developing countries on an individual basis as and when they come;
  • (b) To accept the classification of Turkey as a developing country for the purposes of the Montreal Protocol, noting that Turkey is classified as a developing country by the World Bank, OECD and UNDP;
  • (c) To request the Open-Ended Working Group of the Parties to study and fully define the criteria which will be applied in the future in case of applications for classification as a developing country for the purpose of the Montreal Protocol, and to submit a report for consideration to the Fourth or Fifth Meeting of the Parties;
  • Decision III/6. Participation of developing countries

    To encourage the participation of representatives of developing countries in meetings of assessment panels, the Committee on Destruction Technologies, the Bureau and working groups and in any other meetings convened under the Montreal Protocol and to provide, as far as possible, financial assistance for such participation; Decision III/7. Data Reporting

  • (a) To note the report of the Ad Hoc Group of Experts on the Reporting of Data and the suggestions that it contains, especially the recommendation that developing countries should inform the Secretariat of any difficulties they face in reporting data, and to invite any Party experiencing such difficulties to inform the Secretariat, so that suitable measures can be taken to rectify the situation;
  • (b) Developing countries with a per capita consumption figure which the Secretariat estimates at below 0.3 kilograms should be able to meet their obligation to report 1986 data by informing the Secretariat that they accept its estimate (UNEP/OzL.Pro/WG.2/1/4, paragraph 14 (e));
  • Decision III/8. Trade names of controlled substances
  • (a) To request the Technical and Economic Assessment Panel (operating under Decision II/13 of the Second Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol) to compile a list of full and complete trade names, including any numerical designations of substances controlled by the Montreal Protocol and the amended Montreal Protocol, including mixtures containing controlled substances, and to submit the list to the Secretariat by the end of
    1. November 1991;
  • (b) To request the Secretariat to distribute, by the end of March 1992, the list called for in (a) above, to all the Parties to the Montreal Protocol;
    1. Decision III/9. Formats for reporting data under

    the amended Protocol

    To adopt the revised formats for reporting data under the amended Montreal Protocol, as contained in Annex V of the report of the Third Meeting of the Parties; Decision III/10. Destruction Technologies

    To note the constitution of the Ad Hoc Technical Advisory Committee on Destruction Technologies, established by the Second Meeting of the Parties, and to request the Committee to submit a report to the Secretariat for presentation to the Fourth Meeting of the Parties, in 1992 at least four months before the date set for that meeting; Decision III/11. OpenEnded Working Group of the Parties

  • (a) To recall Article 5, paragraphs 5 and 6 of the Amendment to the Montreal Protocol adopted by Decision II/2 of the Parties at its Second Meeting and reiterate the mandate of the Open-Ended Working Group of the Parties in accordance with Decision II/15 and request that this work be intensified;
  • (b) Should the results obtained by the assessment panels suggest the need to adjust or amend the Protocol, the Working Group would make recommendations in time for consideration by the next meeting of the Parties;
  • (c) To endorse the selection of Mexico and the United Kingdom as
  • co-Chairmen of the Open-Ended Working Group; Decision III/12. Assessment Panels

  • (a) To request the Assessment Panels and in particular the Technology and Economic Assessment Panel to evaluate, without prejudice to Article 5 of the Montreal Protocol, the implications, in particular for developing countries, of the possibilities and difficulties of an earlier phase-out of the controlled substances, for example of the implications of a 1997 phase-out;
  • (b) Taking into account the London Resolution on transitional substances (Annex VII to the report of the Second Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol), to identify the specific areas where transitional substances are required to facilitate the earliest possible phase-out of controlled substances, taking into account environmental, technological and economic factors, where no other more environmentally suitable alternatives are available. The quantities likely to be needed for those areas and for those areas of application currently served by transitional substances shall both be assessed;
  • (c) To request the assessment panels to identify the transitional substances with the lowest potential for ozone depletion required for those areas and suggest, if possible, a technically and economically feasible timetable, indicating associated costs, for the elimination of transitional substances;
  • (d) To request the assessment panels to submit their reports in time for their consideration by the Open-Ended Working Group with a view to their submission for consideration by the Fourth Meeting of the Parties;
  • (e) To endorse Decision II/2, paragraph 2, of the Second Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Vienna Convention.
    1. Decision III/13. Further adjustments to and

    amendments of the Montreal Protocol

    To request the OpenEnded Working Group of the Parties, to consider the following proposals which are aimed at possibly amending the Montreal Protocol and to submit a report on these proposals to the Fourth Meeting of the Parties:

  • (a) Article 7, paragraph 5 (of the amended Protocol):
    1. "In cases of trans-shipment of controlled substances through a third country (as opposed to imports and subsequent reexports), the country of origin of the controlled substances shall be regarded as the exporter and the country of final destination shall be regarded as the importer. In such cases, the responsibility for reporting data shall lie with the country of origin as the exporter and the country of final destination as the importer. Cases of import and reexport should be treated as two separate transactions; the country of origin would report shipment to the country of intermediate destination, which would subsequently report the import from the country of origin and export to the country of final destination, while the country of final destination would report the import.";
  • (b) To review all relevant articles of the Montreal Protocol in order to consider the possible consequences of a country which is operating under Article 5, paragraph 1 of the Protocol, exceeding the consumption ceiling of 0.3 kilograms per capita specified in that Article;
  • (c) To discuss measures including possible amendments to the Protocol to clarify the situations of such a Party with respect to the Article 2 control measures and in particular to specify:
  • (d) To consider the possible implications of a Party losing its
  • Article 5 (1) status if it is at the time a member of the Executive Committee of the Interim Multilateral Fund; Decision III/14. Amendment of the Rules of Procedure

    To amend the Rules of Procedure as follows:

  • (a) Rule 23 delete paragraph 2;
  • (b) Rule 24 delete the words "other than the President", and substitute the words "of the Bureau."
  • Decision III/15. Annex to the Montreal Protocol
  • (a) To adopt as an Annex D to the Montreal Protocol, in accordance with the procedure laid down in Article 10 of the Vienna Convention, the list of products containing controlled substances. The annex is contained in Annex XI of the report of the Third Meeting of the Parties;
  • (b) To request the Secretariat to identify the Customs Code Numbers for the items on the list from the Customs Co-operation Council. The Customs Code Numbers will be submitted for acceptance by the Fourth Meeting of the Parties;
  • Decision III/16. Trade Issues

    To encourage the Parties to inform the Secretariat of the implementation of Article 4 of the Protocol; Decision III/17. Amendment of the Vienna Convention

    To request the Ad Hoc Working Group of Legal Experts on Non-compliance with the Montreal Protocol to consider procedures for expediting the amendment procedure under Article 9 of the Vienna Convention; Decision III/18. Fourth Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol

    To convene the Fourth Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol in September or October 1992 in Denmark; Decision III/19. Financial Mechanism

    To request the Open-Ended Working Group of the Parties to review the indicative list of the categories of incremental costs adopted by the Parties in Decision II/8 and, taking into account the experience gained by the Executive Committee, to develop an indicative list of categories of incremental costs required by paragraph 1 of Article 10 of the Montreal Protocol as amended by the Second Meeting of the Parties. The list so developed should be submitted for consideration by the Fourth Meeting of the Parties; Decision III/20. Composition of the Implementation Committee

    To change paragraph 3 of Non-compliance Procedure as in Annex III to the report of the Second Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol:

    "3. An Implementation Committee is hereby established. It shall consist of ten Parties elected by the Meeting of the Parties for two years, based on equitable geographical distribution. Outgoing Parties may also be

    re-elected for one immediate consecutive term."; Decision III/21. Budgets and Financial Matters

  • (a) To request the Secretariat to submit as soon as possible to all Parties certified and audited accounts of the Montreal Protocol Trust Fund for the expenditures under the Fund for the 1990 financial year;
  • (b) To request the Secretariat to submit to the Parties the certified and audited accounts for 1989 of the Interim Ozone Secretariat;
  • (c) To request the Secretariat to submit certified and audited accounts for subsequent years prior to regular meetings of the Parties;
  • (d) To emphasize that expenditures incurred due to recommendations by the Bureau should only be met either within the budget adopted by the Parties for that year or by other additional contributions made towards these expenditures;
  • (e) To emphasize that it is essential to avoid increases in already adopted budgets in the years to which they relate;
  • (f) To urge all Parties to pay their outstanding contributions promptly and to also pay their future contributions promptly and in full in accordance with the terms of reference and the formula for contributions as attached to as Annex II to the report of the Third Meeting of the Parties;
  • (g) To adopt the final budget for 1992 of US$2,278,645, and for 1993 of
  • US$2,398,990, as set out in Annex I to the report of the Third Meeting of the Parties; Decision III/22. Executive Committee of the Multilateral Fund

  • (a) To adopt the revised 1991 budget for the Fund Secretariat as contained in Annex VII to the report of the Third Meeting of the Parties;
  • (b) To endorse the Rules of Procedure as contained in Annex VI to the report of the Third Meeting of the Parties;
  • (c) To adopt the budget for 1992, included in the threeyear budget for the Fund Secretariat as contained in Annex VIII to the report of the Third Meeting of the Parties;
  • (d) To endorse the proposal to raise the total amount of the Interim Multilateral Fund by US$40 million to US$200 million over the three-year period 19911993;
  • (e) Adopt a revised scale of contributions set out in Annex X to the report of the Third Meeting of the Parties;
  • (f) To endorse the selection of Mexico to act as Chairman and of the United States of America to act as ViceChairman for the second year of the Executive Committee.
  • VI. OTHER MATTERS
  • 60. The representative of Switzerland drew attention to the following statement by the Heads of delegations representing the Governments of Sweden, Finland, Norway, Switzerland, Austria, Germany and Denmark (replacing the draft resolution proposed in document UNEP/OzL.Pro.3/CRP.2):
    1. "We, the heads of delegations of Sweden, Finland, Norway, Switzerland, Austria, Germany and Denmark, believe that the recent analysis of the state of the stratospheric ozone layer calls for the adoption of more stringent control measures at the Fourth Meeting of the Parties in 1992.
    2. We are also of the opinion that the substitution of the controlled substances with transitional substances must be as moderate and temporary as possible.
    1. We note that the London resolution urges the adoption, in accordance with the spirit of the paragraph 11 of Article 2 of the Protocol, of more stringent measures in order to protect the Ozone Layer.
    2. Because of this we express our firm determination to phaseout the production and the consumption of CFCs, halons and carbon tetrachloride controlled by the Montreal Protocol, as soon as possible but not later than the year 1997 and to phaseout 1,1,1trichloroethane (methyl chloroform) as soon as possible but not later than the year 2000. We also think it is necessary to tighten the timetable agreed upon in the Montreal Protocol taking due account of the special situation of developing countries.
    3. We are also determined to limit by no later than 1995 the use of transitional substances (HCFCs) to specific key applications where other more environmentally suitable alternative substances or technologies are not available, and to phaseout their use in those areas as soon as technically feasible."
  • 61. The delegation of the Netherlands expressed sympathy with the above statement but commented that the action programme in force in its country would probably result in levels of reduction similar to those described in the above statement and that endorsement of the statement would preclude discussions on more stringent controls currently taking place with
    1. representatives of industry at the national level. An annual report on the phaseout programme was published and could be made available to interested Parties.
  • 62. One delegation suggested that the agenda for the next meeting of the Parties should include an item covering the status of the reporting of activities by individual countries in compliance with the requirements of articles 4 and 9 of the Montreal Protocol.
  • 63. The delegate of Germany informed the Meeting that the Federal Government was currently preparing a conference to be held from 24 to 26 February 1992 in Berlin, at which, inter alia, the results of the research activities supported by Germany would be presented. The conference was intended to provide an opportunity for an international exchange of information and experience, which should also be of special interest to developing countries. The results would be published in the form of conference proceedings (also in English). This report would be made available to interested parties, not restricted to participants in the conference.
  • VII. ADOPTION OF THE REPORT
  • 64. The Meeting adopted the present report, on the basis of the draft report contained in documents UNEP/OzL.Pro.3/L.4 and /L.4 Add.1, 2, 3 and 4, at its closing session on 21 June 1991.
  • VIII. CLOSURE OF THE MEETING
  • 65. After the usual exchange of courtesies, the President declared the Meeting closed.
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    ANNEX I

    MONTREAL PROTOCOL TRUST FUND BUDGETS FOR THE SECRETARIAT REVISED 1991 AND 1992 AND 1993 (US DOLLARS)

    w/m 1991 w/m 1992 w/m 1993 GRAND TOTAL 10 PROJECT PERSONNEL COMPONENT

    1100 Project personnel (a) (Title & Grade)

    1101 Secretary (Coordinator) (D1)(*) 4.5 45,000 6 54,000 6 56,000 155,000

    (Shared with VC)

    1102 Deputy Secretary (Lawyer) (P4/5) 0 0 12 96,000 12 96,000 192,000

    1103 Programme Officer (Lawyer) (P3) 5 41,000 12 75,000 12 77,000 193,000

    1104 Programme Officer (Chemist/ 3 19,000 6 43,000 6 38,500 100,500

    (Env Scientist) (Shared with VC)(P3/4)

    1105 Administrative Officer (P2/3) 5.5 32,080 6 30,000 6 32,000 94,080

    (Shared with VC)

    1199 Total 137,080 298,000 299,500 734,580

    1200 Consultants (b)

    1201 Assistance in data reporting 80,000 90,000 100,000 270,000

    1299 Total 80,000 90,000 100,000 270,000

    1300 Administrative support (Title & Grade)

    1301 Administrative Assistant (G7) 6 6,500 6 7,000 6 7,500 21,000

    (Shared with VC)

    1302 Senior Secretary (G6) 12 12,000 12 12,000 12 13,000 37,000

    1303 Secretary (shared with VC) (G6) 0 0 6 6,000 6 6,500 12,500

    1304 Secretary (shared with VC) (G6) 0 0 6 6,000 6 6,500 12,500

    1320 Temporary assistance 5,000 0 0 5,000

    1321 CSC (conference servicing costs) for 170,000 0 0 170,000

    3rd Meeting of the Parties (1991) ©

    1322 CSC Prep Meeting for Parties Meeting (1991) © 145,000 0 0 145,000

    1323 CSC WG Meetings (3) © 420,000 0 0 420,000

    1324 CSC Meetings of the Bureau (2) © 65,000 0 0 65,000

    1325 CSC Meetings of the assessment panels © 24,000 0 0 24,000

    w/m 1991 w/m 1992 w/m 1993 GRAND TOTAL

    1326 CSC Meetings of the Committees (3) © 30,000 0 0 30,000

    1331 CSC 4th Meeting of the Parties (1992) © 0 165,000 0 165,000

    1332 CSC Prep Meeting for Parties Meeting (1992) © 0 165,000 0 165,000

    1333 CSC WG Meetings (2) © 0 350,000 0 350,000

    1334 CSC Meetings of the Bureau (2) © 0 68,000 0 68,000

    1335 CSC Meetings of the Committees (4) © 0 30,000 0 30,000

    1336 CSC Informal Consultation meetings (2) © 0 15,000 0 15,000

    1341 CSC 5th Meeting of the Parties (1993) © 0 0 136,000 136,000

    1342 CSC Prep Meeting for Parties Meeting (1993) © 0 0 136,000 136,000

    1343 CSC WG Meetings (2) © 0 0 377,000 377,000

    1344 CSC Meetings of the Bureau (2) © 0 0 74,000 74,000

    1345 CSC Meetings of the Committees (4) © 0 0 33,000 33,000

    1346 CSC Informal Consultation meetings (2) © 0 0 20,000 20,000

    1399 Total 877,500 824,000 809,500 2,511,000

    1600 Travel on official business (d)

    1601 Travel & subsistence (Secretariat staff) 60,000 65,000 70,000 195,000

    1602 Travel & subsistence (UNEP Conf Servc Staff) 20,000 25,000 30,000 75,000

    1699 Total 80,000 90,000 100,000 270,000

    1999 Component total 1,174,580 1,302,000 1,309,000 3,785,580 30 MEETING COMPONENT

    3300 Meetings/conferences, etc. (e)

    3301 Participants (DC) to 3rd Meeting of Parties 90,000 0 0 90,000

    in 1991 (shared with 3 other MP and VC mtgs)

    3302 Participants (DC) to Prep Meetings for 1991 43,000 0 0 43,000

  • 3rd Parties Meeting (shared with 3 other MP
  • and VC meetings)
  • 3303 Participants (DC) to WG Meetings in 1991 180,000 0 0 180,000 (3 mtg x 15 participants x $ 4,000)

    3304 Participants (DC) to Bureau Meetings in 1991 16,000 0 0 16,000 (2 mtgs x 2 x $ 4,000)

    3305 Participants (DC) to Meetings of the Assess 240,000 0 0 240,000

    ment Panels in 1991 (estimate)

    3306 Participants (DC) to Committee Meetings in 40,000 0 0 40,000 1991 (total estimate for 10 partts at $ 4,000)

    3311 Participants (DC) to 4th Meeting of Parties 0 100,000 0 100,000

  • in 1992 (40 part x $ 5,000 shared with prep
  • meeting)
  • 3312 Participants (DC) to Prep Meetings for 1992 0 100,000 0 100,000

  • 4th Part Mtg (40 x $ 5,000 shared with parties
  • meeting)
  • 3313 Participants (DC) to WG Meetings in 1992 0 200,000 0 200,000

    (2 mtgs x 20 partts x $ 5,000)

    w/m 1991 w/m 1992 w/m 1993 GRAND TOTAL

    3314 Participants (DC) to Bureau Meetings in 1992 0 30,000 0 30,000 (2 mtgs x 3 partts x $ 5,000)

    3315 Participants (DC) to Committee Meetings in 0 50,000 0 50,000 1992 (total estimate for 10 partts at $ 5,000)

    3321 Participants (DC) to 5th Meeting of Parties 0 0 120,000 120,000

  • in 1993 (40 parts x $ 6,000 x 1.5 wks shared
  • with prep meeting and VC)
  • 3322 Participants (DC) to Prep Meetings for 1993 0 0 120,000 120,000

  • 5th Part Mtg (40 partts x $ 6,000 x 1.5 wks shared
  • with Parties meeting and VC)
  • 3323 Participants (DC) to WG Meetings in 1993 0 0 240,000 240,000 (2 mtgs x 20 partts x $ 6,000)

    3324 Participants (DC) to Bureau Meetings in 1993 0 0 36,000 36,000 (2 mtgs x 3 partts x $ 6,000)

    3325 Participants (DC) to Committee Meetings in 0 0 60,000 60,000

    1993 (total estimate for 10 partts at $ 6,000)

    3399 Total 609,000 480,000 576,000 1,665,000

    3999 Component total 609,000 480,000 576,000 1,665,000 40 EQUIPMENT AND PREMISES COMPONENT

    4100 Expendable equipment (item under $500) (f)

    4101 Miscellaneous expendables 5,000 7,500 10,000 22,500

    4199 Total 5,000 7,500 10,000 22,500

    4200 Nonexpendable equipment (g)

    4201 Personal computers (4) (shared with VC) 8,000 16,000 0 24,000

    4202 Photocopiers (2) (shared with VC) 10,000 0 0 10,000

    4203 Telefax machine (1) (shared with VC) 3,000 0 0 3,000

    4204 Portable computers (3) (shared with VC) 10,000 5,000 0 15,000

    4299 Total 31,000 21,000 0 52,000

    4999 Component total 36,000 28,500 10,000 74,500 50 MISCELLANEOUS COMPONENT

    5100 Operation and maintenance of equipment (h)

    5101 Maintenance of equipment 2,000 6,000 8,000 16,000

    5199 Total 2,000 6,000 8,000 16,000

    w/m 1991 w/m 1992 w/m 1993 GRAND TOTAL

    5200 Reporting costs (i)

    5201 Reporting (general) 30,000 35,000 40,000 105,000

    5202 Reporting (Technical Assessment Panels) 135,000 0 0 135,000

    5299 Total 165,000 35,000 40,000 240,000

    5300 Sundry (j)

    5301 Communications 15,000 25,000 30,000 70,000

    5302 Freight charges (shipment of documents) 10,000 15,000 20,000 45,000

    5303 Others 5,000 5,000 5,000 15,000

    5399 Total 30,000 45,000 55,000 130,000

    5400 Hospitality (k)

    5401 Hospitality 15,000 20,000 25,000 60,000

    5499 Total 15,000 20,000 25,000 60,000

    5999 Component total 212,000 106,000 128,000 446,000

    99 SUBTOTAL 2,031,580 1,916,500 2,023,000 5,971,080

    Contingency (l) 112,668 100,000 100,000 312,668

    Programme support costs (13%) 278,752 262,145 275,990 816,887

    GRAND TOTAL 2,423,000 2,278,645 2,398,990 7,100,635

    ============================================================================================================================

    NB (*) The post of Coordinator (Lawyer) in the budget approved by the Parties to the Vienna Convention in the 1st

    meeting in Helsinki in April 1989 is the same as that of Secretary (Coordinator) in the budget approved by

    the Parties to the Montreal Protocol in the 2nd meeting in London in 1990 where also the post was raised

    to the level of D1.

  • (a) The Coordinator and the Administrative Officer joined the Secretariat in March and February 1991 respectively and the Scientist will join the Secretariat on 1 July 1991. One programme officer
  • will join the Secretariat in August while the other will do so in January 1992. NB (*) continues

  • (b) Consultancy to provide assistance to countries in the area of data reporting has been singled out for increased attention and the budget is the Secretariat's best calculation of the activities requirements.
  • (c) Conference servicing costs calculated as follows:
  • 1991 preparatory meeting and the third parties meeting based on currently obligated quotations

    for back to back meetings of Governing Council, Vienna Convention, Montreal Protocol and

    Biodiversity in six languages inclusive of $ 23,000 for Montreal Protocol presession documents

    divided equally between the preparatory and parties meetings.

    preparation into three languages.

    ongoing worldwide.

    longer than normal working hours for the interpretation.

    1992 the preparatory and parties meetings will be convened back to back with only each other and

    are each calculated based on $ 42,000 for 125 pages documents preparation in six languages and

    six languages interpretation (inclusive of administrative support and in session and

    post session documentation costing $ 121,000.

    administrative support and insession and postsession documentation costing $ 140,000.

    at $ 7,000 and $ 27,000 respectively.

    1993 the preparatory and parties meetings will be convened back to back with only each other and

    together with the parties meeting for the Vienna Convention and are each calculated based on

    $ 46,000 for 125 pages documents preparation in six languages and six languages interpretation

    (inclusive of administrative support and in session and postseesion documentation costing $ 90,000.

    administrative support and insession and postsession documentation costing $ 150,000.

    at $ 8,000 and $ 29,000 respectively.

    1. English and administrative support of $ 11,000.
    NB (*) continues
  • (d) 1991 based on commitments and 1992 and 1993 based on previous estimated for 15 Ozone staff travels and 5 UNEP conference servicing staff per year.
  • (e) Participation cost of developing countries worked out as follows:
  • 1991 based on quotation of the 60 participants distributed invariably among the Montreal Protocol and

    the Vienna Convention preparatory and parties meetings as well as the Executive Committee meeting and

    as shared between them appropriately.

    1992 the preparatory and parties meeting are based on an estimated number of 40 participants each costing

    $ 5,000 and shared equally between them.

    1993 the preparatory and parties meeting are based on an estimated number of 40 participants each costing

    $ 6,000 per week and for a one week and a half and shared equally between them and also the Vienna

    the Vienna Convention parties meeting.

  • (f) An estimated cost of office expendables.
  • (g) Equipment costs estimated based on models compatible with UNEP standards.
  • (h) Estimate based on existing UNEP maintenance contracts.
  • NB (*) continues
  • (i) Estimate based on the Montreal Protocol activities needs and the Technical Assessment Panel's needs.
  • (j) Estimate based on experience of the Secretariat in carrying out the activities of the Montreal Protocol.
  • (k) Estimate based on past experience of the Secretariat.
  • (l) In 1991 the contingency has been calculated as the difference between the current revised budget and the budget adopted at the Second Parties meeting for the year. In 1992 and 1993, it is calculated
  • on a percentage basis using around 5% of that year's budget.

    Return to menu


    ANNEX II

    PLEDGED CONTRIBUTIONS BY PARTIES TOWARDS THE MONTREAL PROTOCOL TRUST FUND FOR 1992 AND 1993

    |||||

    | | %AGE BASED ON | 1992 PLEDGES | 1993 PLEDGES |

    | COUNTRY | UN SCALE WITH | IN | IN |

    | | 25% CEILING | US DOLLARS | US DOLLARS |

    |||||

    | Argentina | 0.68% | 15,485 | 16,303 |

    | Australia | 1.62% | 36,837 | 38,782 |

    | Austria | 0.76% | 17,362 | 18,279 |

    | Bahrain | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Bangladesh | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Belgium | 1.20% | 27,452 | 28,901 |

    | Brazil | 1.49% | 34,021 | 35,818 |

    | Bulgaria | 0.15% | 3,519 | 3,705 |

    | Burkina Faso | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Byelorussian S.S.R. | 0.34% | 7,743 | 8,152 |

    | Cameroon | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Canada | 3.18% | 72,500 | 76,329 |

    | Chile | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Czechoslovakia | 0.68% | 15,485 | 16,303 |

    | Denmark | 0.71% | 16,189 | 17,044 |

    | Ecuador | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Egypt | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Fiji | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Finland | 0.53% | 11,966 | 12,598 |

    | France | 6.44% | 146,643 | 154,387 |

    | Gambia | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Germany, F.R. | 9.64% | 219,612 | 231,211 |

    | Ghana | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Greece | 0.41% | 9,385 | 9,881 |

    | Guatemala | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Hungary | 0.22% | 4,927 | 5,187 |

    | Iceland | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Iran | 0.71% | 16,189 | 17,044 |

    | Ireland | 0.19% | 4,223 | 4,446 |

    | Italy | 4.11% | 93,617 | 98,561 |

    | Japan | 11.72% | 267,007 | 281,109 |

    | Jordan | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Kenya | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Libyan Arab Jamahiriya | 0.29% | 6,570 | 6,917 |

    | Liechtenstein | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Luxembourg | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Malawi | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Malaysia | 0.11% | 2,581 | 2,717 |

    | Maldives | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Malta | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Mexico | 0.97% | 22,055 | 23,220 |

    | Netherlands | 1.70% | 38,714 | 40,758 |

    | New Zealand | 0.25% | 5,631 | 5,928 |

    | Nigeria | 0.21% | 4,693 | 4,940 |

    | Norway | 0.57% | 12,905 | 13,586 |

    | Panama | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Poland | 0.58% | 13,139 | 13,833 |

    | Portugal | 0.19% | 4,223 | 4,446 |

    | Singapore | 0.11% | 2,581 | 2,717 |

    | South Africa | 0.46% | 10,558 | 11,116 |

    | Spain | 2.01% | 45,753 | 48,169 |

    | Sri Lanka | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Sweden | 1.25% | 28,390 | 29,889 |

    | Togo | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Trinidad and Tobago | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Tunisia | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    |||||

    |||||

    | | %AGE BASED ON | 1992 PLEDGES | 1993 PLEDGES |

    | COUNTRY | UN SCALE WITH | IN | IN |

    | | 25% CEILING | US DOLLARS | US DOLLARS |

    |||||

    | Uganda | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Ukrainian S.S.R. | 1.29% | 29,329 | 30,877 |

    | Switzerland | 1.11% | 25,340 | 26,678 |

    | Syrian Arab Republic | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Thailand | 0.10% | 2,346 | 2,470 |

    | U.S.S.R. | 10.29% | 234,394 | 246,773 |

    | United Arab Emirates | 0.20% | 4,458 | 4,693 |

    | United Kingdom | 5.00% | 114,029 | 120,052 |

    | United States | 25.00% | 569,661 | 599,748 |

    | Uruguay | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | Venezuela | 0.59% | 13,374 | 14,080 |

    | Yugoslavia | 0.47% | 10,793 | 11,363 |

    | Zambia | 0.00% | 0 | 0 |

    | | | | |

    | EEC | 2.50% | 56,966 | 59,975 |

    | | | | |

    |========================|===============|===============|===============|

    | TOTAL | 100.00% | 2,278,645 | 2,398,990 |

    |========================|===============|===============|===============|

    Return to menu


    ANNEX III

    STATUS OF CONTRIBUTIONS BY PARTIES TOWARDS THE MONTREAL PROTOCOL TRUST FUND FOR 1990 AND 1991

    ( 31 MAY 1991 )

    || || ||

    | | | 1 9 9 0 | | 1 9 9 1 |

    | COUNTRY | |||| ||||

    | | | AGREED | PAYMENTS MADE | OUTSTANDING | | AGREED | PAYMENTS MADE | OUTSTANDING |

    | | |CONTRIBUTIONS | IN | PAYMENTS | |CONTRIBUTIONS | IN | PAYMENTS |

    | | |IN US DOLLARS | US DOLLARS | IN US DOLLARS| |IN US DOLLARS | US DOLLARS | IN US DOLLARS |

    || |||| ||||

    | Argentina | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 15,806 | 0 | 15,806 |

    | Australia | | 41,311 | 41,311 | 0 | | 41,195 | 16,790 | 24,405 |

    | Austria | | 19,440 | 19,440 | 0 | | 19,417 | 7,945 | 11,472 |

    | Bahrain | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Bangladesh | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Belgium | | 30,861 | 12,001 | 18,860 | | 30,699 | 0 | 30,699 |

    | Brazil* | | 38,152 | 0 | 38,152 | | 38,046 | 0 | 38,046 |

    | Bulgaria** | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 3,444 | 0 | 3,444 |

    | Burkina Faso | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Byelorussian S.S.R. | | 8,748 | 3,385 | 5,363 | | 8,659 | 0 | 8,659 |

    | Cameroon | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Canada | | 81,406 | 31,694 | 49,712 | | 81,077 | 0 | 81,077 |

    | Chile | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Czechoslovakia | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 17,318 | 0 | 17,318 |

    | Denmark | | 18,225 | 15,077 | 3,148 | | 18,105 | 0 | 18,105 |

    | Ecuador | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Egypt | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Fiji | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Finland | | 13,365 | 13,365 | 0 | | 13,382 | 5,584 | 7,798 |

    | France | | 164,514 | 164,514 | 0 | | 163,991 | 68,357 | 95,634 |

    | Gambia | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Germany, F.R.*** | | 246,406 | 246,406 | 0 | | 245,593 | 173,464 | 72,129 |

    | Ghana | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Greece | | 10,449 | 10,449 | 0 | | 10,495 | 3,774 | 6,721 |

    | Iran | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 16,525 | 0 | 16,525 |

    | Ireland | | 4,617 | 4,617 | 0 | | 4,723 | 6,833 | (2,110) |

    | Italy | | 104,978 | 0 | 104,978 | | 104,692 | 0 | 104,692 |

    | Japan | | 299,381 | 299,381 | 0 | | 298,595 | 124,432 | 174,163 |

    | Jordan | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Kenya | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Libyan Arab Jamahiriya*| | 1,839 | 0 | 1,839 | | 7,347 | 0 | 7,347 |

    || |||| ||||

    || || ||

    | | | 1 9 9 0 | | 1 9 9 1 |

    | COUNTRY | |||| ||||

    | | | AGREED | PAYMENTS MADE | OUTSTANDING | | AGREED | PAYMENTS MADE | OUTSTANDING |

    | | |CONTRIBUTIONS | IN | PAYMENTS | |CONTRIBUTIONS | IN | PAYMENTS |

    | | |IN US DOLLARS | US DOLLARS | IN US DOLLARS| |IN US DOLLARS | US DOLLARS | IN US DOLLARS |

    || |||| ||||

    | Guatemala | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Hungary | | 5,589 | 5,589 | 0 | | 5,510 | 2,149 | 3,361 |

    | Iceland | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Liechtenstein | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Luxembourg | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Malawi | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Malaysia | | 2,916 | 0 | 2,916 | | 2,886 | 0 | 2,886 |

    | Maldives | | 1,500 | 1,500 | 0 | | 1,500 | 1,500 | 0 |

    | Malta | | 9,988 | 9,988 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Mexico | | 24,786 | 20,509 | 4,277 | | 24,664 | 0 | 24,664 |

    | Netherlands | | 43,498 | 43,498 | 0 | | 43,294 | 61,348 | (18,054) |

    | New Zealand | | 6,318 | 6,318 | 0 | | 6,297 | 8,948 | (2,651) |

    | Nigeria | | 5,346 | 0 | 5,346 | | 5,248 | 0 | 5,248 |

    | Norway | | 14,580 | 14,580 | 0 | | 14,431 | 23,412 | (8,981) |

    | Panama | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Poland* | | 3,678 | 1,802 | 1,876 | | 14,694 | 0 | 14,694 |

    | Portugal | | 4,617 | 4,617 | 0 | | 4,723 | 264 | 4,459 |

    | Singapore | | 2,916 | 1,128 | 1,788 | | 2,886 | 0 | 2,886 |

    | South Africa* | | 11,907 | 11,907 | 0 | | 11,807 | 4,746 | 7,061 |

    | Spain | | 51,274 | 51,274 | 0 | | 51,165 | 18,447 | 32,718 |

    | Sri Lanka | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Sweden | | 31,833 | 25,911 | 5,922 | | 31,749 | 0 | 31,749 |

    | Switzerland | | 28,431 | 28,431 | 0 | | 28,338 | 28,338 | 0 |

    | Syrian Arab Republic | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Thailand | | 2,673 | 2,673 | 0 | | 2,624 | 883 | 1,741 |

    | Togo | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Trinidad and Tobago | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Tunisia | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Uganda | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Ukrainian S.S.R. | | 32,806 | 12,821 | 19,985 | | 32,798 | 0 | 32,798 |

    | U.S.S.R. | | 262,930 | 102,465 | 160,465 | | 262,124 | 0 | 262,124 |

    | United Arab Emirates* | | 5,103 | 0 | 5,103 | | 4,985 | 0 | 4,985 |

    | United Kingdom | | 127,820 | 127,820 | 0 | | 127,520 | 127,520 | 0 |

    | United States | | 607,509 | 135,000 | 472,509 | | 605,750 | 30,000 | 575,750 |

    | Uruguay | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    || |||| ||||

    || || ||

    | | | 1 9 9 0 | | 1 9 9 1 |

    | COUNTRY | |||| ||||

    | | | AGREED | PAYMENTS MADE | OUTSTANDING | | AGREED | PAYMENTS MADE | OUTSTANDING |

    | | |CONTRIBUTIONS | IN | PAYMENTS | |CONTRIBUTIONS | IN | PAYMENTS |

    | | |IN US DOLLARS | US DOLLARS | IN US DOLLARS| |IN US DOLLARS | US DOLLARS | IN US DOLLARS |

    || |||| ||||

    | Venezuela | | 15,066 | 5,846 | 9,220 | | 14,956 | 0 | 14,956 |

    | Yugoslavia** | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 9,053 | 0 | 9,053 |

    | Zambia | | 0 | 0 | 0 | | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | | | | | | | | | |

    | EEC | | 60,751 | 60,751 | 0 | | 60,575 | 16,337 | 44,238 |

    | | | | | | | | | |

    |========================| |==============|===============|==============| |==============|===============|===============|

    | TOTAL | | 2,447,527 | 1,536,068 | 911,459 | | 2,508,686 | 731,071 | 1,777,615 |

    |========================| |==============|===============|==============| |==============|===============|===============|

    NB: (*) New Parties who ratified during 1990.

    (**) New Parties who ratified during 1991 and their contributions have been calculated on a prorata basis for

    remaining period.

    (***) The contributions of the Federal Republic of Germany and the German Democratic Republic have been combined.

    The 1990 figure is comprised of $33,778 and $ 212,628, while the 1991 figure is comprised of $ 33,585

    and $212,008.

    Return to menu


    ANNEX IV

    1990 EXPENDITURES FOR THE TRUST FUND FOR THE MONTREAL PROTOCOL ON SUBSTANCES THAT DEPLETE THE OZONE LAYER

    |||

    | BL Items | (US DOLLARS) |

    |||

    | | |

    | 10 PROJECT PERSONNEL COMPONENT | |

    | | |

    | 1100 Project personnel | |

    | Advertisements | 4,199 |

    | 1200 Consultancies | |

    | Data reporting | 26,391 |

    | 1300 Administrative support | |

    | General Service staff | 7,720 |

    | Second Meeting of the Parties | 76,073 |

    | Working Group Meetings | 284,842 |

    | Bureau Meetings | 5,658 |

    | Informal Consultation Meeting | 91,750 |

    | OpenEnded WG Meeting | 121,793 |

    | Data Reporting Meeting | 6,210 |

    | Implementation Committee Meeting | 617 |

    | 1600 Travel on official business | |

    | Ozone Secretariat staff | 45,093 |

    | UNEP Conference Servicing Staff | 58,936 |

    | | |

    | 1999 Component total | 729,282 |

    | | |

    | 30 PARTICIPATION COMPONENT | |

    | | |

    | 3300 Developing Countries participation | |

    | Participtn at informal meeting | 18,678 |

    | | |

    | 3999 Component total | 18,678 |

    | | |

    | 40 EQUIPMENT COMPONENT | |

    | | |

    | 4200 Nonexpendable equipment | |

    | Photocopier & personal computer | 6,908 |

    | | |

    | 4999 Component total | 6,908 |

    | | |

    | 50 MISCELLANEOUS COMPONENT | |

    | | |

    | 5300 Communication and sundries | 49,683 |

    | 5400 Hospitality | 24,403 |

    | | |

    | 5999 Component total | 74,086 |

    |||

    | 99 GRAND TOTAL | 828,954 |

    |||

    | Programme support costs (13%) | 107,764 |

    |===========================================|==============|

    | TOTAL 1990 TRUST FUND EXPENDITURE | 936,718 |

    |===========================================|==============|

  • UNEP/OzL.Pro.3/11
  • Annex V
  • Page 36
  • Return to menu


    ANNEX V

    New Annex to the Montreal Protocol Annex D*

    A LIST OF PRODUCTS** CONTAINING CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES SPECIFIED IN ANNEX A

    (adopted in accordance with Article 4, paragraph 3)

    PRODUCTS CUSTOMS CODE NUMBER

  • 1. Automobile and truck air conditioning
    1. units (whether incorporated in vehicles
    2. or not) .....................
  • 2. Domestic and commercial refrigeration
  • and air conditioning/heat pump equipment*** .....................

    e.g. Refrigerators .....................

    Freezers .....................

    Dehumidifiers .....................

    Water coolers .....................

    Ice machines .....................

    Air conditioning and heat

    pump units .....................

    3. Aerosol products, except medical aerosols .....................

    4. Portable fire extinguisher .....................

    5. Insulation boards, panels and pipe covers .....................

    6. Pre-polymers .....................

    ** Though not when transported in consignments of personal or household effects or in similar non-commercial situations normally exempted from customs attention.

    *** When containing controlled substances in Annex A as a refrigerant and/or in insulating material of the product.

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    Annex VI

    RULES OF PROCEDURE FOR MEETINGS OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE FOR THE INTERIM MULTILATERAL FUND FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MONTREAL PROTOCOL

    APPLICABILITY

    Unless otherwise provided for by the Montreal Protocol or by the decision of the Parties, or excluded by the Rules of Procedure hereunder, the Rules of Procedures for meetings of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer shall apply mutatis mutandis to the proceedings of any meeting of the Executive Committee. Rule 1

    These Rules of procedure shall apply to any meeting of the Executive Committee for the Interim Multilateral Fund under the Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer convened in accordance with Article 11 of the Protocol. DEFINITIONS Rule 2

    For the purposes of these rules:

  • 1. "Executive Committee" means the Executive Committee for the Interim Multilateral Fund as established by decision II/8 at the Second Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol.
  • 2. "Committee members" means Parties selected as members of the Executive Committee for the Interim Multilateral Fund.
  • 3. "Meeting" means any meeting of the Executive Committee for the Interim Multilateral Fund.
  • 4. "Chairman" means the Committee member selected Chairman of the Executive Committee.
  • 5. "Secretariat" means the Multilateral Fund Secretariat.
  • 6. "Fund" means the Interim Multilateral Fund.
  • PLACE OF MEETINGS Rule 3

    The meetings of the Executive Committee shall take place at the seat of the Fund Secretariat, unless other appropriate arrangements are made by the Fund Secretariat in consultation with the Executive Committee. DATES OF MEETINGS Rule 4

  • 1. Meetings of the Executive Committee shall be held at least twice every year.
  • 2. At each meeting, the Executive Committee shall fix the opening date and duration of the next meeting.
  • Rule 5

    The Secretariat shall notify all Committee members of the dates and venue of meetings at least six weeks before the meeting. OBSERVERS Rule 6

  • 1. The Secretariat shall notify the President of the Bureau and the implementing agencies inter alia UNEP, UNDP and the World Bank of any meeting of the Executive Committee so that they may participate as observers.
  • 2. Such observers may, upon invitation of the Chairman, participate without the right to vote in the proceedings of any meeting.
  • Rule 7
  • 1. The Secretariat shall notify any body or agency, whether national or international, governmental or nongovernmental, qualified in the field related to the work of the Executive Committee, that has informed the Secretariat of its wishes to be represented, of any meeting so that it may be represented by an observer subject to the condition that their admission to the meeting is not objected to by at least one third of the Parties present at the meeting. However, the Executive Committee may determine that any portion of its meetings involving sensitive matters may be closed to observers. Nongovernmental observers should include observers from developing and developed countries and their total number should be limited as far as possible.
  • 2. Such observers may, upon invitation of the Chairman and if there is no objection from the Committee members present, participate without the right to vote in the proceedings of any meeting in matters of direct concern to the body or agency which they represent.
  • AGENDA Rule 8

    In agreement with the Chairman and the ViceChairman, the Secretariat shall prepare the provisional agenda for each meeting. Rule 9

    The Secretariat shall report to the meeting on the administrative and financial implications of all substantive agenda items submitted to the meeting, before they are considered by it. Unless the meeting decides otherwise, no such item shall be considered until at least twentyfour hours after the meeting has received the Secretariat's report on the administrative and financial implications. Rule 10

    Any item of the agenda of any meeting, consideration of which has not been completed at the meeting, shall be included automatically in the agenda of the next meeting, unless otherwise decided by the Executive Committee. REPRESENTATION AND CREDENTIALS Rule 11

    The Executive Committee shall consist of seven Parties from the group of Parties operating under paragraph 1 of Article 5 of the Protocol and seven Parties from the group of Parties not so operating. Each group shall select its Executive Committee members. The members of the Executive Committee shall be formally endorsed by the Meeting of the Parties. Rule 12

    Each Committee member shall be represented by an accredited representative who may be accompanied by such alternate representatives and advisers as may be required. OFFICERS Rule 13

    If the Chairman is temporarily unable to fulfill the obligation of the office, the ViceChairman shall in the interim assume all the obligations and authorities of the Chairman. Rule 14

    If the Chairman or ViceChairman is unable to complete the term of office the Committee members representing the group which selected that officer shall select a replacement to complete the term of office. Rule 15

  • 1. The Secretariat shall:
  • (a) Make the necessary arrangements for the meetings of the Executive Committee, including the issue of invitations and preparation of documents and reports of the meeting;
  • (b) Arrange for the custody and preservation of the documents of the meeting in the archives of the international organization designated as secretariat of the Convention; and
  • (c) Generally perform all other functions that the Executive Committee may require.
  • Rule 16

    The Chief Officer of the Secretariat shall be the Secretary of any meeting of the Executive Committee. VOTING Rule 17

    Decisions of the Executive Committee shall be taken by consensus whenever possible. If all efforts at consensus have been exhausted and no agreement reached, decisions shall be taken by a twothirds majority of the Parties present and voting, representing a majority of the Parties operating under paragraph 1 of Article 5 and a majority of the Parties not so operating present and voting. LANGUAGES Rule 18

    The meeting of the Executive Committee shall be conducted in those official languages of the United Nations required by members of the Executive Committee. Nevertheless the Executive Committee may agree to conduct its business in one of the United Nations official languages. AMENDMENTS TO RULES OF PROCEDURE Rule 19

    These rules of procedure may be amended according to Rule 17 above and formally endorsed by the Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol.

    OVERRIDING AUTHORITY OF THE PROTOCOL
    Rule 20

    In the event of any conflict between any provision of these rules and any provision of the Protocol, the Protocol shall prevail.

    Return to menu


    Annex VII

    REVISED BUDGET FOR THE FUND SECRETARIAT FOR 1991 (United States dollars)

    Work Multilateral Counterpart Total

    months Fund contribution budget

    10 PERSONNEL COMPONENT

    1100 Personnel (Title & Grade)

    1101 Chief, Fund Secretariat (D2) 10.5 101 000 101 000

    1102 Deputy Chief (P5) 6 60 000 60 000

    1103 Deputy Chief (P5) 1 12 000 10 000

    1104 Programme Officer (P3) 1 10 000 10 000

    1105 Programme Officer (P3) 6 40 000 40 000

    1106 Programme Officer (P3) 1 10 000 10 000

    1107 Programme Officer (P3) 1 10 000 10 000

    1108 Information Officer (P3) 1 10 000 10 000

    1109 Administrative Officer (P4) 6 48 000 48 000

    1199 Total 301 000 301 000

    1200 Consultants

    1201 Consultancies and other related studies 200 000 200 000

    1299 Total 200 000 200 000

    1300 Administrative support (Title & Grade)

    1301 Administrative Assistant (G9) 6 19 000 19 000

    1302 Library Assistant (G9) 1 3 000 3 000

    1303 Senior Secretary (Chief Officer) (G7) 9 24 000 24 000

    1304 Senior Secretary (Deputy) (G7) 6 16 000 16 000

    1305 Secretary (Deputy) (G6) 1 2 400 2 400

    1306 Secretary (for 3 P3s) (G6) 6 16 000 16 000

    1307 Secretary (for P3/P4) (G6) 1 2 400 2 400

    1308 Secretary (for P3/Consultants) (G6) 3 7 200 7 200

    1309 Clerk/Messenger/Receptionist (G4) 6 12 000 12 000

    Multilateral Counterpart Total

    Fund contribution budget

    1321 Conference servicing costs (CSC): 50 000 50 000

    Third Meeting of Executive Committee

    1322 CSC: Fourth Meeting of Executive Committee 35 000 35,000

    1323 CSC: Fifth Meeting of Executive Committee 50 000 50 000

    1324 CSC: Two meetings of subcommittees 10 000 10 000

    1399 Total 247 000 247 000

    1600 Travel on official business

    1601 Travel & subsistence (Secretariat staff) 62 500 62 500

    1699 Total 62 500 62 500

    1999 Component total, Personnel 810 500 810 500

    30 MEETINGS COMPONENT

    3300 Meetings, conferences etc.

    3301 Participants travel and subsistence (PTS): Third Meeting 73 500 73 500

    of Executive Committee (7x3x$ 3,500)

    3302 PTS: Fourth Meeting of Executive Committee (7x3x$ 3,500) 73 500 73 500

    3303 PTS: Fifth Meeting of Executive Committee (7x3x$ 4,350) 91 875 91 875

    3304 PTS: two meetings of subcommittees (3x2x$ 3,500) 21 000 21 000

    3305 Travel and subsistence of Chairman and ViceChairman 31 250 31 250

    3399 Total 291 125 291 125

    3999 Component total, Meetings 291 125 291 125

    Multilateral Counterpart Total

    Fund contribution budget

    40 EQUIPMENT AND PREMISES COMPONENT

    4100 Expendable equipment (items under $500)

    4101 Office stationery supplies 10 000 10 000

    4199 Total 10 000 10 000

    4200 Nonexpendable equipment

    4201 Furniture 41 300 278 510 319 810

    4202 Typewriters (2) 1 000 1 000

    4203 Others 10 000 10 000

    4299 Total 52 300 278 510 330 810

    4300 Premises

    4301 Rent of offices 61 338 174 047 235 385

    4399 Total 61 338 174 047 235 385

    4999 Component total, Equipment and Premises 123 638 452 557 576 195

    50 MISCELLANEOUS COMPONENT

    5100 Operation and maintenance of equipment

    5101 Maintenance of equipment 2 000 2 000

    5102 Maintenance of offices 5 000 5 000

    5103 Rental of computer equipment 18 000 18 000

    5104 Rental of photocopier(s) 6 000 6 000

    5105 Rental of telecommunication equipment 21 000 21 000

    5199 Total 52 000 52 000

    Multilateral Counterpart Total

    Fund contribution budget

    5200 Reporting costs

    5201 Reporting (document production costs) 30 000 30 000

    5299 Total 30 000 30 000

    5300 Sundry

    5301 Communications 35 000 35 000

    5302 Freight charges (shipment of documents) 10 000 10 000

    5303 Others 5 000 5 000

    5399 Total 50 000 50 000

    5400 Hospitality

    5401 Official hospitality 10 000 10 000

    5499 Total 10 000 10 000

    5999 Component total, Miscellaneous 142 000 142 000

    99 Total excluding administrative support 1 367 263 452 557 1 819 820

    Administrative support charges 52 390 52 390

    GRAND TOTAL 1 419 653 452 557 1 872 210

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    Annex VIII

    THREE YEAR PLAN AND BUDGET FOR THE FUND SECRETARIAT 1991 - 1993 (United States Dollars)

    1991 1992 1993

    work work work Total

    months $ months $ months $ Budget

    10 PERSONNEL COMPONENT

    1100 Personnel (Title & Grade)

    1101 Chief, Fund Secretariat (D2) 10.5 101 000 12 111 000 12 116 000 328 000

    1102 Deputy Chief (P5) 6 60 000 12 80 000 12 84 000 224 000

    1103 Deputy Chief (P5) 1 12 000 12 80 000 12 84 000 176 000

    1104 Programme Officer (P3) 1 10 000 12 59 000 12 62 000 131 000

    1105 Programme Officer (P3) 6 40 000 12 59 000 12 62 000 161 000

    1106 Programme Officer (P3) 1 10 000 12 59 000 12 62 000 131 000

    1107 Programme Officer (P3) 1 10 000 12 59 000 12 62 000 131 000

    1108 Information Officer (P3) 1 10 000 12 59 000 12 62 000 131 000

    1109 Administrative Officer (P4) 6 48 000 12 70 000 12 74 000 192 000

    1199 Total 301 000 36 000 668 000 1 605 000

    1200 Consultants

    1201 Consultancies and other related studies 200 000 200 000

    1202 Evaluation of country specific studies/work

    programmes/reports by implementing agencies 200 000 200 000 400 000

    1299 Total 200 000 200 000 200 000600 000

    1300 Administrative support (Title & Grade)

    1301 Administrative Assistant (G9) 6 19 000 12 39 000 12 42 000 100 000

    1302 Library Assistant (G9) 1 3 000 12 39 000 12 42 000 84 000

    1303 Senior Secretary (Chief Officer) (G7) 9 24 000 12 35 000 12 37 000 96 000

    1304 Senior Secretary (Deputy) (G7) 6 16 000 12 35 000 12 37 000 88 000

    1305 Secretary (Deputy) (G6) 1 2 400 12 31 000 12 31 000 64 400

    1306 Secretary (for 3 P3s) (G6) 6 16 000 12 35 000 12 35 000 86 000

    1307 Secretary (for P3/P4) (G6) 1 2 400 12 31 000 12 31 000 64 400

    1308 Secretary (for P3/Consultants) (G6) 3 7 200 12 31 000 12 31 000 69 200

    1309 Clerk/Messenger/Receptionist (G4) 6 12 000 12 26 000 12 28 000 66 000

    1991 1992 1993

    work work work Total

    months $ months $ months $ Budget

    1321 Conference servicing costs (CSC) 50 000 50 000

    Third Meeting of Executive

    Committee 1322 CSC: Fourth Meeting of Executive

    Committee 35 000 35 000 1323 CSC: Fifth Meeting of Executive

    Committee 50 000 50 000

    1324 CSC: Two meetings of subcommittees 10 000 10 000

    1325 CSC: Sixth Meeting of Executive Committee 75 000 75 000

    1326 CSC: Seventh Meeting of Executive Committee 75 000 75 000

    1327 CSC: Eighth Meeting of Executive Committee 75 000 75 000

    1328 CSC: Two meetings of subcommittees 20 000 20 000

    1329 CSC: Nineth Meeting of Executive Committee 100 000 100 000

    1330 CSC: Tenth Meeting of Executive Committee 100 000 100 000

    1331 CSC: Eleventh Meeting of Executive Committee 100 000 100 000

    1332 CSC: Two meetings of subcommittees 30 000 30 000

    1399 Total 247 000 547 000 644 000 1 438 000

    1600 Travel on official business

    1601 Travel & subsistence (Secretariat staff) 62 500 100 000 120 000 282 500

    1699 Total 62 500 100 000 120 000 282 500

    1999 Component Total, Personnel 810 500 1 483 000 1 632 000 3 925 500

    30 MEETINGS COMPONENT

  • 3300 Meetings, conferences etc.
  • 3301 Participants travel and subsistence (PTS):
    1. Third Meeting of Executive

    Committee (7x3x$ 3,500) 73 500 73 500

    3302 PTS: Fourth Meeting of Executive 73 500 73 500

    Committee (7x3x$ 3,500)

    3303 PTS: Fifth Meeting of Executive 91 875 91 875

    Committee (7x3x$ 4,375)

    1991 1992 1993

    work work work Total

    months $ months $ months $ Budget

    3304 PTS: two meetings of 21 000 21 000

    subcommittees (3x2x$ 3,500) 3305 Travel & subsistence of Chairman

    and ViceChairman 31 250 37 500 43 750 112 500 3306 PTS: Sixth Meeting of Executive

    Committee (7x3x$ 5,250) 110 250 110 250 3307 PTS: Seventh Meeting of Executive

    Committee (7x3x$ 5,250) 110 250 110 250 3308 PTS: Eighth Meeting of Executive

    Committee (7x3x$ 5,250) 110 250 110 250 3309 PTS: two meetings of

    subcommittees (3x2x$ 5,250) 31 500 31 500 3310 PTS: Nineth Meeting of Executive

    Committee (7x3x$ 6,125) 128 625 128 625 3311 PTS: Tenth Meeting of Executive

    Committee (7x3x$ 6,125) 128 625 128 625 3312 PTS: Eleventh Meeting of Executive

    Committee (7x3x$ 6,125) 128 625 128 625 3313 PTS: two meetings of

    subcommittees (3x2x$ 6,125) 36 750 36 750

    3399 Total 291 125 399 750 466 375 1 157 250

    3999 Component Total, Meetings 291 125 399 750 466 375 1 157 250

    40 EQUIPMENT AND PREMISES COMPONENT

    4100 Expendable equipment (items under $500)

    4101 Office stationery supplies 10 000 15 000 15 000 40 000

    4102 Software and other computer expendables 15 000 10 000 25 000

    4199 Total 10 000 30 000 25 000 65 000

    1991 1992 1993

    work work work Total

    months $ months $ months $ Budget

    4200 Nonexpendable equipment

    4201 Furniture 319 810 319 810

    4202 Typewriters (2/0/0) 1 000 1 000

    4203 Personal computers (0/3/1) 22 500 7 500 30 000

    4204 Portable computers (0/3/1) 15 000 5 000 20 000

    4205 Others 10 000 10 000 10 000 35 000

    4299 Total 330 810 47 500 22 500 400 810

    4300 Premises

    4301 Rent of offices 235 385 469 200 469 200 1 173 785

    4399 Total 235 385 469 200 469 200 1 173 785

    4999 Component total, Equipment and Premises 576 195 546 700 516 700 1 639 595

    50 MISCELLANEOUS COMPONENT

    5100 Operation and maintenance of equipment

    5101 Maintenance of equipment 2 000 5 000 10 000 17 000

    5102 Maintenance of offices 5 000 5 000 7 000 17 000

    5103 Rental of computer equipment 18 000 18 000 18 000 54 000

    5104 Rental of photocopier(s) 6 000 15 000 15 000 36 000

    5105 Rental of telecommunication equipment 21 000 18 000 18 000 57 000

    5199 Total 52 000 61 000 68 000 181 000

    5200 Reporting costs

    5201 Reporting (document production costs) 30 000 50 000 75 000 155 000

    5299 Total 30 000 50 000 75 000 155 000

    1991 1992 1993

    work work work Total

    months $ months $ months $ Budget

    5300 Sundry

    5301 Communications 35 000 50 000 75 000 160 000

    5302 Freight charges (shipment of documents) 10 000 20 000 30 000 60 000

    5303 Others 5 000 5 000 5 000 15 000

    5399 Total 50 000 75 000 110 000 235 000

    5400 Hospitality

    5401 Official hospitality 10 000 15 000 20 000 45 000

    5499 Total 10 000 15 000 20 000 45 000

    5999 Component total, Miscellaneous 142 000 201 000 273 000 616 000

    99 TOTAL excluding administrative support 1 367 263 2 161 250 2 418 875 5 947 388

    Administrative support charges 52 390 121 940 127 660 301 990

    Counterpart contribution 452 557 469 200 469 200 1 390 957

    GRAND TOTAL 1 872 210 2 752 390 3 015 735 7 640 335

    ======================================================================================================================

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    ANNEX IX THREE YEAR BUDGET FOR THE FUND OPERATIONS 1991 - 1993

    Budget Fund Operation:

    1991 1992 1993

    (US$ million) (US$ million) (US$ million)

    Fund Income 53.33 73.33 73.33

    Planned Expenditures 53.33 73.33 73.33

    Allocated (as of 18 June 1991):

    Implementing Agencies

    IBRD 5 000 000

    UNDP 1 261 800

    UNEP 1 676 920

    Total 7 938 720

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    Annex X

    MULTILATERAL FUND FOR THE FINANCIAL MECHANISM: SCALE OF CONTRIBUTIONS BY THE PARTIES BASED ON THE UNITED NATIONS SCALE OF ASSESSMENT WITH NO COUNTRY PAYING MORE THAN 25 PER CENT FOR 1991, 1992, AND 1993

    Developing countries that are operating under paragraph 1, article 5

    _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    | | UN SCALE OF | %AGE BASED ON | 1991 PLEDGES | 1992 PLEDGES | 1993 PLEDGES | |

    | COUNTRY | CONTRIBUTION | UN SCALE WITH | IN | IN | IN | TOTAL |

    | | %AGE | 25% CEILING | US DOLLARS | US DOLLARS | US DOLLARS | |

    |__________________________|______________|_______________|______________|______________|______________|______________|

    | | | 0 | | | | |

    | Argentina* | 0.66% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Bangladesh* | 0.01% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Brazil | 1.45% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Burkina Faso | 0.01% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Cameroon | 0.01% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Chile | 0.08% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | China* | 0.79% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Ecuador | 0.03% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Egypt | 0.07% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Fiji | 0.01% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Gambia* | 0.01% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Ghana | 0.01% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Guatemala | 0.02% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Iran* | 0.69% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Jordan | 0.01% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Kenya | 0.01% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Libyan Arab Jamahiriya* | 0.28% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Malawi* | 0.01% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Malaysia | 0.11% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Maldives | 0.01% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Mexico | 0.94% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Nigeria | 0.20% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Panama** | 0.02% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Sri Lanka | 0.01% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Syrian Arab Republic | 0.04% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Thailand | 0.10% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Togo* | 0.01% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Trinidad and Tobago | 0.05% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Tunisia | 0.03% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Uganda | 0.01% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Uruguay* | 0.04% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Venezuela | 0.57% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Yugoslavia* | 0.46% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | Zambia | 0.01% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    | | | | | | | |

    | TOTAL | 6.77% | 0.00% | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |

    |__________________________|______________|_______________|______________|______________|______________|______________| Developing countries that are not operating under paragraph 1, article 5

    _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    | | | | | | | |

    | Bahrain | 0.02% | 0.02% | 12,553 | 16,904 | 16,904 | 46,361 |

    | Malta | 0.01% | 0.01% | 6,276 | 8,452 | 8,452 | 23,180 |

    | Singapore | 0.11% | 0.13% | 69,041 | 92,973 | 92,973 | 254,987 |

    | United Arab Emirates | 0.19% | 0.22% | 119,253 | 160,590 | 160,590 | 440,433 |

    |__________________________|______________|_______________|______________|______________|______________|______________| Developed countries

    _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    | | UN SCALE OF | %AGE BASED ON | 1991 PLEDGES | 1992 PLEDGES | 1993 PLEDGES | |

    | COUNTRY | CONTRIBUTION | UN SCALE WITH | IN | IN | IN | TOTAL |

    | | %AGE | 25% CEILING | US DOLLARS | US DOLLARS | US DOLLARS | |

    |__________________________|______________|_______________|______________|______________|______________|______________|

    | | | | | | | |

    | Australia | 1.57% | 1.81% | 985,407 | 1,326,980 | 1,326,980 | 3,639,367 |

    | Austria | 0.74% | 0.85% | 464,459 | 625,456 | 625,456 | 1,715,370 |

    | Bulgaria* | 0.15% | 0.17% | 0 | 126,782 | 126,782 | 253,563 |

    | Byelorussian S.S.R. | 0.33% | 0.38% | 207,124 | 278,919 | 278,919 | 764,963 |

    | Canada | 3.09% | 3.56% | 1,939,432 | 2,611,699 | 2,611,699 | 7,162,831 |

    | Czechoslovakia* | 0.66% | 0.76% | 0 | 557,839 | 557,839 | 1,115,677 |

    | Finland | 0.51% | 0.59% | 320,100 | 431,057 | 431,057 | 1,182,214 |

    | Hungary | 0.21% | 0.24% | 131,806 | 177,494 | 177,494 | 486,794 |

    | Iceland | 0.03% | 0.03% | 18,829 | 25,356 | 25,356 | 69,542 |

    | Japan | 11.38% | 13.11% | 7,142,633 | 9,618,492 | 9,618,492 | 26,379,617 |

    | Liechtenstein | 0.01% | 0.01% | 6,276 | 8,452 | 8,452 | 23,180 |

    | New Zealand | 0.24% | 0.28% | 150,635 | 202,850 | 202,850 | 556,336 |

    | Norway | 0.55% | 0.63% | 345,206 | 464,866 | 464,866 | 1,274,937 |

    | Poland* | 0.56% | 0.65% | 0 | 473,318 | 473,318 | 946,635 |

    | South Africa | 0.45% | 0.52% | 282,442 | 380,345 | 380,345 | 1,043,131 |

    | Sweden | 1.21% | 1.39% | 759,454 | 1,022,704 | 1,022,704 | 2,804,863 |

    | Switzerland | 1.08% | 1.24% | 677,860 | 912,827 | 912,827 | 2,503,514 |

    | Ukrainian S.S.R. | 1.25% | 1.44% | 784,560 | 1,056,513 | 1,056,513 | 2,897,585 |

    | U.S.S.R. | 9.99% | 11.51% | 6,270,202 | 8,443,650 | 8,443,650 | 23,157,501 |

    | United States | 25.00% | 25.00% | 13,333,333 | 18,333,333 | 18,333,333 | 50,000,000 |

    | | | | | | | |

    | E.E.C. members | | | | | | |

    | | | | | | | |

    | Belgium | 1.17% | 1.35% | 734,348 | 988,896 | 988,896 | 2,712,140 |

    | Denmark | 0.69% | 0.80% | 433,077 | 583,195 | 583,195 | 1,599,467 |

    | France | 6.25% | 7.20% | 3,922,799 | 5,282,564 | 5,282,564 | 14,487,926 |

    | Germany | 9.36% | 10.79% | 5,874,784 | 7,911,167 | 7,911,167 | 21,697,118 |

    | Greece | 0.40% | 0.46% | 251,059 | 338,084 | 338,084 | 927,227 |

    | Ireland | 0.18% | 0.21% | 112,977 | 152,138 | 152,138 | 417,253 |

    | Italy | 3.99% | 4.60% | 2,504,315 | 3,372,389 | 3,372,389 | 9,249,092 |

    | Luxembourg | 0.06% | 0.07% | 37,659 | 50,713 | 50,713 | 139,084 |

    | Netherlands | 1.65% | 1.90% | 1,035,619 | 1,394,597 | 1,394,597 | 3,824,813 |

    | Portugal | 0.18% | 0.21% | 112,977 | 152,138 | 152,138 | 417,253 |

    | Spain | 1.95% | 2.25% | 1,223,913 | 1,648,160 | 1,648,160 | 4,520,233 |

    | United Kingdom | 4.86% | 5.60% | 3,050,369 | 4,107,721 | 4,107,721 | 11,265,812 |

    | | | | | | | |

    | EEC MEMBERS TOTAL | 30.74% | 35.43% | 19,293,896 | 25,981,761 | 25,981,761 | 71,257,417 |

    | | | | | | | |

    |==========================|==============|===============|==============|==============|==============|==============|

    | TOTAL | 96.85% | 100.00% | 53,320,777 | 73,339,611 | 73,339,611 | 200,000,000 |

    |==========================|==============|===============|==============|==============|==============|==============|

    NB: (*) Parties who have acceded to the Montreal Protocol in between the Second meeting of the

    Parties and the Third Meeting of the Parties. (**) Panama has been reclassified as a developing country operating under paragraph 1 of

    Article 5 as opposed to not operating under paragraph 1 of Article 5.

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    Annex XI

    FORMATS FOR REPORTING DATA UNDER THE AMENDED MONTREAL PROTOCOL

    INTRODUCTION SHEET
  • 1. The data formats are for the use of the Parties in reporting data on the production, import and export of each individual substances listed in the annexes of the Amendment to the Montreal Protocol, as required by Article 7.
  • 2. There are 6 forms for reporting the required data:
  • (a) Data for the base years for controlling production and consumption
    1. For reporting 1986 data, as required by Article 7, paragraph 1:

    Form 1: Annex A substances

    For reporting 1989 data, as required by Article 7, paragraph 2:

    Form 1: Annex B substances

    Form 2: Annex C substances

  • (b) Annual reporting of data for the year the Protocol enters into force for the country in question and for each year thereafter, in accordance with paragraph 3
  • Form 4: Annex A substances

    Form 5: Annex B substances

    Form 6: Annex C substances

  • 3. Please report the data in metric tons, without multiplying by the relevant ODPS (Ozone Depleting Potentials). The data on each substance should also include isomers [Note 1.1.1. trichloroethane (methyl chloroform) does not include 1.1.2. trichloroethane].
  • 4. The data reported in accordance with the formats will be used to determine the calculated levels of consumption upon which the control measures are based. It is thus crucial that data be provided separately for each individual substance listed in the formats.
  • 5. Please note that both paragraphs 1 and 2 of Article 7 provide that the Parties should submit the best possible estimates where actual data are not available.
  • 6. In accordance with the recommendation of the Ad Hoc Group of Experts on the Reporting Data, which held its first meeting at Nairobi on 6 and 7 December 19910, the Parties are requested to report on the extra production as allowed to meet the basic domestic needs of countries operating under paragraph 1 of Article 5 of the Protocol. The quantity of the production increase and the country to be supplied by this production increase should be reported under "quantity" and "destination".
    1. The export figures as well as the production figures reported should include the increased amounts of production for supplying the countries operating under Article 5, paragraph 1. The allowable increase in production should also be reported as metric tonnes.
  • 7. In accordance with the recommendation of the Ad Hoc Group of Experts on the Reporting of Data, which held its first meeting at Nairobi on 6 and 7 December, 1990, countries having freetrade zones inside their territories should make a special effort to include in their data reporting production, import and export figures for such zones.
  • 8. In accordance with the recommendation of the Ad Hoc Group of Experts on the Reporting of Data, which held its first meeting at Nairobi on 6 and 7 December 1990, the quantities of controlled substances used for refilling the refrigeration and fireextinguishing systems of ships in ports should be regarded as forming part of consumption of the country with jurisdiction over the part and should therefore, not, be included in its exports figures.
  • 9. With regard to the data on "amounts destroyed", the Parties, decided at their Second Meeting, to establish an Ad Hoc technical advisory committee on destruction technologies to analyse destruction technologies and to assess their efficiency and environmental acceptability, so as to develop approval criteria and measurements. Separate data on the amounts destroyed need not be reported until such approval criteria are established.
  • 10. Amounts used as feedstocks, e.g. amounts of carbon tetrachloride used as feedstock in the production of CFC 11 and 12, should be reported. They are to be subtracted from total production (see definition production).
  • 11. No separate column has been included to record on the amounts recycled or reused. However, these amounts are not to be regarded as production (see definition of production).
  • DEFINITIONS
  • 1. "Production" means the amount of controlled substances produced, minus the amount destroyed by technologies to be approved by the Parties and minus the amount entirely used as feedstock in the manufacture of other chemicals. The amount recycled and reused is not to be considered as "production" (Article 1, paragraph 5 of the Amendment).
  • 2. "Consumption" means production plus imports minus exports of controlled substances (Article 1, paragraph 6, of the Protocol and the Amendment).
  • 3. "calculated levels" of production, imports, exports and consumption mean levels determined in accordance with article 3 (Article 1, paragraph 7, of the Protocol and the Amendment).
  • 4. "Transitional substance" means a substance in annex C to the Protocol, whether existing alone or in a mixture. It includes the isomers of any such substance, as may be specified in annex c, but excludes any transitional substance or mixture which is in a manufactured product other than a container used for the transportation or storage of that substance.
  • 5. Methyl chloroform is 1,1,1trichloroethane and does not include 1,1,2trichloroethane.
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    ANNEX XII Reporting of data under Article 7, paragraph 1

    1986 DATA ON PRODUCTION, IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF CFCs AND HALONS CONTROLLED BY THE AMENDED MONTREAL PROTOCOL

    (Metric Tonnes)

    Country

    Annex A Substances
    Ref: Data form 2

    SUBSTANCES PRODUCTION IMPORTS EXPORTS

    GROUP I

    CFCl3 CFC11

    CF2Cl2 CFC12

    C2F3Cl3 CFC113

    C2F4Cl2 CFC114

    C2F5Cl CFC115

    TOTAL FOR GROUP I

    GROUP II

    CF2BrCl HALON 1211

    CF3Br HALON 1301

    C2F4Br2 HALON 2402

    TOTAL FOR GROUP II

    Notes:

  • 1. Please report the data by weight and not multiplied by ODP.
  • 2. Isomers should be included under each substance.
  • Ref: Data form 2 Reporting of data under Article 7, paragraph 2 1989 DATA ON PRODUCTION, IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF SUBSTANCES CONTROLLED BY THE MONTREAL PROTOCOL

    (Metric Tonnes)

    Country

    Annex B Substances

    SUBSTANCES PRODUCTION IMPORTS EXPORTS

    GROUP I

    CF3Cl (CFC13)

    C2FCl5 (CFC111)

    C2F2Cl4 (CFC112)

    C3FCl7 (CFC211)

    C3F2Cl6 (CFC212)

    C3F3Cl5 (CFC213)

    C3F4Cl4 (CFC214)

    C3F5Cl3 (CFC215)

    C3F6Cl2 (CFC216)

    C3F7Cl (CFC217)

    TOTAL FOR GROUP I

    GROUP II

  • CCl4
  • (carbon tetrachloride)
  • GROUP III

  • C2H3Cl3**
  • (methyl chloroform, i.e.
  • 1,1,1trichloroethane)
  • Notes:

  • 1. Please report the data by weight and not multiplied by ODP.
  • 2. Isomers should be included under each substance.
    1. Ref: Data form 3
    Reporting of data under Article 7, paragraph 2

    1989 DATA ON PRODUCTION, IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF TRANSITIONAL SUBSTANCES

    LISTED IN THE MONTREAL PROTOCOL

    (Metric Tonnes)

    Country:

    Annex C Substances

    SUBSTANCES PRODUCTION IMPORTS EXPORTS

    CFHCl2 (HCFC21)

    CHF2Cl (HCFC22)

    CH2FCl (HCFC31)

    C2HFCl4 (HCFC121)

    C2HF2Cl3 (HCFC122)

    C2HF3Cl2 (HCFC123)

    C2HF4Cl (HCFC124)

    C2H2FCl3 (HCFC131)

    C2H2F2Cl2 (HCFC132)

    C2H2F3Cl (HCFC133)

    C2H3FCl2 (HCFC141)

    C2H3F2Cl (HCFC142)

    C2H4FCl (HCFC151)

    C3HFCl6 (HCFC221)

    C3HF2Cl5 (HCFC222)

    C3HF3Cl4 (HCFC223)

    C3HF4Cl3 (HCFC224)

    C3HF5Cl2 (HCFC225)

    C3HF6Cl (HCFC226)

    C3H2FCl5 (HCFC231)

    SUBSTANCES PRODUCTION IMPORTS EXPORTS

    C3H2F2Cl4 (HCFC232)

    C3H2F3Cl3 (HCFC233)

    C3H2F4Cl2 (HCFC234)

    C3H2F5Cl (HCFC235)

    C3H3FCl4 (HCFC241)

    C3H3F2Cl3 (HCFC242)

    C3H3F3Cl2 (HCFC243)

    C3H3F4Cl (HCFC244)

    C3H4FCl3 (HCFC251)

    C3H4F2Cl2 (HCFC252)

    C3H4F3Cl (HCFC253)

    C3H5FCl2 (HCFC261)

    C3H5F2Cl (HCFC262)

    C3H6FCl (HCFC271)

    Notes:

  • 1. Please report the data by weight and not multiplied by ODP.
  • 2. Isomers should be included under each substance.
  • Ref: Data form 4 Reporting of data under Article 7, paragraph 3

    DATA ON PRODUCTION, IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF SUBSTANCES CONTROLLED BY THE AMENDED MONTREAL PROTOCOL (Metric Tonnes)

    Country: Year: January December 199

  • July 199 June 199
  • (delete as appropriate)
  • Annex A Substances

    IMPORTS EXPORTS ANNEX A TOTAL AMOUNTS AMOUNTS FROM FROM TO TO SUBSTANCES PRODUCTION DESTROYED FOR FEED PARTIES NON PARTIES NONPARTIES

    STOCKS PARTIES GROUP 1

    CFCl3 (CFC11)

    CF2Cl2 (CFC12)

    C2F3Cl3 (CFC113)

    C2F4Cl2 (CFC114)

    C2F5Cl (CFC115) TOTAL FOR GROUP 1 GROUP II

    CF2BrCl (HALON 1211)

    CF3Br (HALON 1301)

    C2F4Br2 (HALON 2402) TOTAL FOR GROUP II

    Notes:

  • 1. Please report the data by weight and not multiplied by ODP.
  • 2. Isomers should be included under each substance.
  • Ref: Data form 5 Reporting of data under Article 7, paragraph 3

    DATA ON PRODUCTION, IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF SUBSTANCES CONTROLLED BY THE AMENDED MONTREAL PROTOCOL (Metric Tonnes)

    Country: Year: January December 199

  • July 199 June 199
  • (delete as appropriate)
  • Annex B Substances

    IMPORTS EXPORTS

    ANNEX B TOTAL AMOUNTS AMOUNTS INCREASED PRODUCTION FROM FROM TO TO SUBSTANCES PRODUCTION DESTROYED FOR FEED AS FURTHER ALLOWED* PARTIES NON PARTIES NONPARTIES

    STOCKS Quan.** Dest.** PARTIES GROUP I

    CF3Cl (CFC13)

    C2FCl5 (CFC111)

    C2F2Cl4 (CFC112)

    C3FCl7 (CFC211)

    C3F2Cl6 (CFC212)

    C3F3Cl5 (CFC213)

    C3F4Cl4 (CFC214)

    C3F5Cl3 (CFC215)

    C3F6Cl2 (CFC216)

    C3F7Cl (CFC217) TOTAL FOR GROUP I Notes

  • 1. Please report the data by weight and not multiplied by ODP.
  • 2. Isomers should be included under each substance.
  • Ref: Data form 5 continued Reporting of data under Article 7, paragraph 3 DATA ON PRODUCTION, IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF TRANSITIONAL SUBSTANCES LISTED IN THE AMENDEND MONTREAL PROTOCOL

    (Metric Tonnes)

    Country: Year: January December 199

  • July 199 June 199
  • (delete as appropriate)
  • Annex B Substances

    IMPORTS EXPORTS

    ANNEX A TOTAL AMOUNTS AMOUNTS INCREASED PRODUCTION FROM FROM TO TO SUBSTANCES PRODUCTION DESTROYED FOR FEED AS FURTHER ALLOWED* PARTIES NON PARTIES NONPARTIES

    STOCKS Quan.** Dest.** PARTIES GROUP I

  • CCl4
  • (carbon tetrachloride)
  • GROUP III
  • C2H3Cl3**
  • (methyl chloroform, i.e.
  • l,l,l trichloroethane)
  • Notes:

    ** Abbreviation for quantity and destination.

    *** This formula does not refer to 1,1,2-trichloroethane.

  • 1. Please report the data by weight and not multiplied by ODP.
  • 2. Isomers should be included under each substance.
  • Ref: Data form 6 Reporting of data under Article 7, paragraph 3 DATA ON PRODUCTION, IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF TRANSITIONAL SUBSTANCES LISTED IN THE AMENDED MONTREAL PROTOCOL

    (Metric Tonnes)

    Country: Year: January December 199

  • July 199 June 199
  • (delete as appropriate)
  • Annex C Substances

    IMPORTS EXPORTS

    ANNEX C TOTAL AMOUNTS AMOUNTS FROM FROM TO TO TRANSITIONAL SUBSTANCES PRODUCTION DESTROYED FOR FEED PARTIES NON PARTIES NONPARTIES

    STOCKS PARTIES GROUP I

    CFCl2 (HCFC21)

    CHF2Cl (HCFC22)

    CH2FCl (HCFC31)

    C2HFCl4 (HCFC121)

    C2HF2Cl3 (CFC122)

    C2HF3Cl2 (HCFC123)

    C2HF4Cl (HCFC124)

    C2H2FCl3 (HCFC131)

    C2H2F2Cl2 (HCFC132)

    C2H2F3Cl (HCFC133)

    C2H3FCl2 (HCFC141)

    C2H3F2Cl (HCFC142)

    C2H4FCl (HCFC151)

    C3HFCl6 (HCFC221)

    IMPORTS EXPORTS

    ANNEX C TOTAL AMOUNTS AMOUNTS FROM FROM TO TO TRANSITIONAL SUBSTANCES PRODUCTION DESTROYED FOR FEED PARTIES NON PARTIES NONPARTIES

    STOCKS PARTIES

    C3HF2Cl5 (HCFC222)

    C3HF3Cl4 (HCFC223)

    C3HF4Cl3 (HCFC224)

    C3HF5Cl2 (HCFC225)

    C3HF6Cl (HCFC226)

    C3H2FCl5 (HCFC231)

    -----

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